feminine ending


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feminine ending

n.
1.
a. An extra unstressed syllable at the end of a line of verse.
b. Music An ending of a phrase or cadence falling on a rhythmically light note or chord.
2. Grammar A final syllable or termination that marks or forms words in the feminine gender.

feminine ending

n
(Poetry) prosody an unstressed syllable at the end of a line of verse
References in periodicals archive ?
Beginning with the Graeco-Babylonaica, he then examines the evidence for stems that end in a vowel, stems that end in a single (einfach) consonant, stems that end in a double (long) consonant, stems that end in a consonant and feminine ending, and stems that end in two different consonants.
The fascinating thing is that even though one clear translation would be "fatherland," it has a feminine ending--the noun form of the word ending in "a." However, in the poem Mickiewicz continues with the vocative case of addressing this homeland or native land or homeland (with a feminine ending).
Here is an example of a "light" (unstressed) compound feminine ending: The same, the same.
As the first woman, I either succeed or it won't be discussed for years," Sleiman says at her office, whose door still reads "pastor" (rai) without the feminine ending, shortly before starting her Sunday sermon at the sanctuary next door at the Tripoli Evangelical Church.
Now, the eye altitude is 28,335 feet and the image includes Masr el-Jadida, El-Zaytoun, Al-Wayli and Al-Qubbh Palace, which goes to show that not everyone agrees on a transliteration for the definite article 'Al/El' and the feminine ending (Is it -a or -h?
This is pronounced "shepes." The three lines at the end make a plural (pronounced "oo") and when combined with the loaf of bread (t, the feminine ending), they make a feminine plural noun, shepsut, "noble women." Together, they spell the name Hatshepsut, foremost of noblewomen.
-- Feminine: use of the feminine ending (-y/-i) instead of the masculine;
According to all traditional canons of French verse analysis, these are indisputably six-syllable lines, with a feminine ending to every line.
Playwrights Horizons has four new works by women on its current slate, recently bowing Kate Fodor's "100 Saints You Should Know" and Sarah Treem's "A Feminine Ending," and continuing with Ruhl's "Cell Phone" and the musical "Saved," with book and lyrics co-written by Rinne Groff.
Numerous nouns referring to living beings (humans and animals) offer a basic masculine name and a feminine ending for the female representatives: le president / la presidente, le chanteur / la chanteuse, le chat / la chatte, le chien / la chienne.
While masculine nouns normally have masculine plural endings and feminine nouns normally have feminine plurals endings, "fathers" has a feminine ending and "women" has a masculine ending.