retroversion

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Related to femoral retroversion: femoral anteversion, external tibial torsion

ret·ro·ver·sion

 (rĕt′rō-vûr′zhən)
n.
1. A turning or tilting backward.
2. The state of being turned or tilted back.

[From Latin retrōversus, retrorse; see retrorse.]

retroversion

(ˌrɛtrəʊˈvɜːʃən)
n
1. the act of turning or condition of being turned backwards
2. (Anatomy) the condition of a part or organ, esp the uterus, that is turned or tilted backwards
ˈretroˌverse adj
ˈretroˌverted adj

ret•ro•ver•sion

(ˌrɛ trəˈvɜr ʒən, -ʃən)

n.
1. a looking or turning back.
2. the resulting state or condition.
3. the tilting backward of an organ, esp. of the uterus.
[1580–90; < Latin retrōvers(us) bent backward (retrō- retro- + versus, past participle of vertere to turn; see verse) + -ion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.retroversion - a turning or tilting backward of an organ or body part; "retroversion of the uterus"
abnormalcy, abnormality - an abnormal physical condition resulting from defective genes or developmental deficiencies
2.retroversion - translation back into the original language; "the teacher translated Latin texts into English which he gave to his students for retroversion"
interlingual rendition, translation, version, rendering - a written communication in a second language having the same meaning as the written communication in a first language
3.retroversion - returning to a former state
reversal - a change from one state to the opposite state; "there was a reversal of autonomic function"
Translations

ret·ro·ver·sion

n. retroversión, inclinación o vuelta hacia atrás;
___ of the uterusdesplazamiento del útero hacia atrás.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mehairi was born premature and developed femoral retroversion, which is a condition where his hips don't close all the way, causing him to walk outwards.
The association of femoral retroversion with slipped capital femoral epiphysis.
The commonly recognized causes of posterior hip instability include hyperlaxity, acetabular or femoral retroversion, bony or ligamentous lesions of the acetabulum, or following trauma or arthroplasty.