fen-phen


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fen-phen

a former drug combination of phentermine with either fenfluramine or dexfenfluramine; also called phen-fen

fen-phen

 (fĕn′fĕn′)
n.
A combination of two drugs, fenfluramine hydrochloride and phentermine, formerly prescribed for weight loss but withdrawn from the market in 1997 because of potentially dangerous side effects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Her normal diet and exercise routine wasn't working, so Mary went to her doctor and received a prescription for a popular combination weight loss drug, Fen-Phen, which she took for just 23 days.
(37) The high rate of deficiency, of course, was explained by the screening process: entire industries had been spawned to screen potential fen-phen claimants; screening sessions were being held in law firms and hotel rooms; diagnosing physicians were working on contingency fees with escalating rewards for more serious diagnoses; (38) and some diagnosing physicians were finding injuries at twelve times the rate predicted by their own research studies.
In 1997, clinicians in Fargo, North Dakota, and the Mayo Clinic notified Wyeth that they had seen thirteen patients on Fen-Phen who had developed valvular disease.
Alida Mundy, author of Dispensing With the Truth, a book about the battle over Fen-Phen, is a senior editor at Cableworld.
In Trenton, New Jersey, jury selection began this week in a test case involving thousands of healthy fen-phen users .
As for "magic pills" that melt the body fat away, we've learned the hard way that such drugs as Redux and fen-phen, as well as over-the-counter weight control products with ephedrine and caffeine, are themselves hazardous.
THE DIET drug known as Fen-Phen was recently implicated as a cause of valvular heart disease in women.
A highly publicized and well-documented example of the association between off-label drug use and the potential for adverse effects was observed with the drug fenfluramine/ phentermine (fen-phen).
Side effects may include symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, but may be as severe as valvular heart disease, as in the case of the now-banned weight loss drug Fen-Phen. Many of these drugs are new, though, so long-term side effects have not yet been reported.
After the fen-phen debacle, we should be wary of any diet pill.
The year after chairing the panel, Pi-Sunyer was identified in a lawsuit as the guest author of a ghostwritten review on obesity commissioned by Wyeth-Ayerst regarding long-term, off-label use of the dangerous "fen-phen" combination (fenfluramine and phentermine).