fermenting


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fer·ment

 (fûr′mĕnt′)
n.
1.
a. An agent, such as an enzyme, bacterium, or fungus, that brings about fermentation.
b. Fermentation.
2.
a. A state of agitation or of turbulent change or development.
b. An agent that precipitates or is capable of precipitating such a state; a catalyst.
v. (fər-mĕnt′) fer·ment·ed, fer·ment·ing, fer·ments
v.intr.
1. To undergo fermentation: cabbage that has fermented.
2. To develop in a turbulent or agitated way; seethe: an idea that was fermenting in his mind for months.
v.tr.
1. To cause to undergo fermentation: Yeasts ferment sugars.
2. To produce by or as if by fermentation: ferment the wine in oak barrels; hostility that was fermented by envy.
3. To make turbulent; excite or agitate: a fiery speech that fermented the crowd.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin fermentum; see bhreu- in Indo-European roots.]

fer·ment′a·bil′i·ty n.
fer·ment′a·ble adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fermenting - a process in which an agent causes an organic substance to break down into simpler substancesfermenting - a process in which an agent causes an organic substance to break down into simpler substances; especially, the anaerobic breakdown of sugar into alcohol
bottom fermentation - a slow kind of alcoholic fermentation at a temperature low enough that the yeast cells can sink to the bottom of the fermenting liquid; used in the production of lager
chemical action, chemical change, chemical process - (chemistry) any process determined by the atomic and molecular composition and structure of the substances involved
top fermentation - a violent kind of alcoholic fermentation at a temperature high enough to carry the yeast cells to the top of the fermenting liquid; used in the production of ale; "top fermentation uses a yeast that ferments at higher temperatures than that used for bottom fermentation"
vinification - the process whereby fermentation changes grape juice into wine
References in classic literature ?
cried Camilla, whose fermenting feelings appeared to rise from her legs to her bosom.
But this superadded consciousness, wearying and annoying enough when it urged on me the trivial experience of indifferent people, became an intense pain and grief when it seemed to be opening to me the souls of those who were in a close relation to me--when the rational talk, the graceful attentions, the wittily-turned phrases, and the kindly deeds, which used to make the web of their characters, were seen as if thrust asunder by a microscopic vision, that showed all the intermediate frivolities, all the suppressed egoism, all the struggling chaos of puerilities, meanness, vague capricious memories, and indolent make-shift thoughts, from which human words and deeds emerge like leaflets covering a fermenting heap.
Mr Vince lowered Ruth gently into a chair and, holding her hand, inspected the fermenting old gentleman gravely.
It could readily be guessed, though, that some great thought was fermenting in his brain.
Romanticism, which has helped to fill some dull blanks with love and knowledge, had not yet penetrated the times with its leaven and entered into everybody's food; it was fermenting still as a distinguishable vigorous enthusiasm in certain long-haired German artists at Rome, and the youth of other nations who worked or idled near them were sometimes caught in the spreading movement.
if I dared own to any human creatu re what was at that very moment secretly fermenting in my mind.
My nephew Nicholas, hot from school, with everything he learnt there, fermenting in his head, and nothing fermenting in his pocket, is just the man you want.
Whether the nuns of yore, being of a submissive rather than a stiff-necked generation, habitually bent their contemplative heads to avoid collision with the beams in the low ceilings of the many chambers of their House; whether they sat in its long low windows telling their beads for their mortification, instead of making necklaces of them for their adornment; whether they were ever walled up alive in odd angles and jutting gables of the building for having some ineradicable leaven of busy mother Nature in them which has kept the fermenting world alive ever since; these may be matters of interest to its haunting ghosts (if any), but constitute no item in Miss Twinkleton's half-yearly accounts.
Ideas, if you like, are fermenting," he said to Pyotr Petrovitch, "and desire for good exists, though it's in a childish form, and honesty you may find, although there are crowds of brigands.
And while fermenting fruit is certainly not a new concept, California Fruit Wine Company is breathing new life into an ancient, untapped category.
They added that the findings should also prompt further tests of the "drunken monkey hypothesis", which proposes that human attraction to alcohol may derive from dependence of primate ancestors on ripe and fermenting fruit.