ferret badger


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Related to ferret badger: honey badger, Melogale

ferret badger

n
(Animals) any small badger of the genus Melogale, of SE Asia, resembling a ferret in appearance and smell
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ferret badger - small ferret-like badger of southeast Asiaferret badger - small ferret-like badger of southeast Asia
badger - sturdy carnivorous burrowing mammal with strong claws; widely distributed in the northern hemisphere
genus Melogale, Melogale - a genus of Mustelidae
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, according to a recent survey about wildlife, the ferret badger population has been increasing in the past 5 years (L.-K.
The last mammal to be discovered was the Borneo ferret badger in 1895.
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the animals found to carry SARS-like viruses in a Chinese market in 2003 were civet cats, racoon-dogs and one ferret badger -an Asian cousin of the common British badger.
When the SARS virus was found in a civet, a racoon dog and a Chinese ferret badger, it wasn't long before the Agrifood and Veterinary Authority of Singapore started trapping and killing cats, even though tests on 140 samples proved negative.
It has also been found in the raccoon dog and Chinese ferret badger. Several of the food handlers in the providence were the first to come down with SAPS.
The study found several coronaviruses closely related genetically to the SARS coronavirus in the raccoon dog and the masked palm civet, and also discovered antibodies against the SARS coronavirus in the Chinese ferret badger, the WHO official said.
For example, the Chinese ferret badger (Melogale moschata) has been associated with human rabies for several years, although diagnoses have not been confirmed (1-4).
However, in June 2013, after ruling out the possibility of canine distemper and pseudorabies infections in three dead ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) from Nantou and Yunlin Counties and using a series of tests for rabies diagnosis at the National Taiwan University, including Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and RT-PCR, the first rabies case was finally confirmed on June 26, 2013 by the National Laboratory, Animal Health Research Institute, Council of Agriculture, and Executive Yuan, Taiwan.
SARS (suspected of being transmitted from animals such as civet cats and ferret badgers) and diseases strongly suspected to be common to both people and some primates (including Ebola hemorrhagic fever and simian immunodeficiency virus) are examples of those that worry many public health officials.