ferromagnet

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Related to ferromagnets: diamagnetism

fer·ro·mag·net

 (fĕr′ō-măg′nĭt)
n.
1.
a. A ferromagnetic substance.
b. A substance with magnetic properties resembling those of iron.
2. A ferromagnetic magnet.

ferromagnet

(ˌfɛrəʊˈmæɡnət)
n
a ferromagnetic substance
References in periodicals archive ?
In both cases odd-frequency superconductivity is generated without any need for ferromagnets or interfaces, Completely different from the situation in sf structures.
The first step in showing that this may be possible comes from the theory of ferromagnets.
Josephson junctions with ferromagnets used as the middle of the "sandwich" are currently of greatest practical interest.
Previously, iron, cobalt and nickel were the only elements to be room-temperature ferromagnets, materials that retain magnetism after exposure to a magnetic field.
This is an edited collection of 10 peer-reviewed papers having to do with studies of physical characteristics of ferromagnets, ferroelectrics and ferroelastics over a narrow temperature range.
23]) as well as the modeling of conducting ferromagnets (via [sigma] [not equal to] 0 in (2.
With properties similar to those of magnets on a refrigerator, ferromagnets use a magnetic interaction between its constituent atoms that align all their spins - the origin of the atoms' magnetism - in a single direction.
In ferromagnets, the spins maintain a parallel orientation.
Among the topics are skyrmions and nuclei, rotational symmetry breaking in baby Skyrme models, noncommutative skyrmions in quantum Hall ferromagnets, half-skyrmion theory for high-temperature superconductivity, holographic baryons, and baryon physics in a five-dimensional model of hadrons.
Ferromagnets such as iron have spins densely packed in the crystal lattice, and as a result these spins experience positive Heisenberg exchange as a coherent energetic interaction that favors their alignment (4-5).
SYLVESTER, "Continuous-Spin Ising Ferromagnets," Doctoral dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1976.
Over 150 papers discuss such topics as microstructure evolution upon thermomagnetic treatment of soft magnetic alloys, structural aspects of stabilizing magnetic fluids by mono-carboxyl acids, microwave properties of sandwich structures based on iron and barium nanoparticles, magneto-optical effects in excitonic one-dimensional structures, and temperature hysteresis in the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory for strong ferromagnets.