fertility cult


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fertility cult

n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the practice in some settled agricultural communities of performing religious or magical rites to ensure good weather and crops and the perpetuity of the tribe
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The contrast between the fertility cult and the worship of God was sharp and uncompromising.The fertility gods were many, Moses trusted the one and only true God.
There is also the head of a Roman figurine depicting a female which may be linked to a fertility cult.
This pericope describing Jacob wrestling with God was originally composed in a "fertility cult" environment: a culture in which organized religion guaranteed fertility for someone's family, animals and fields by supplying them with the special word, gestures and behavior that controlled the actions of the specific fertility gods and goddesses in their lives.
It is a story about the plight of these women who are in the clutches of an ancient fertility cult and are forced to serve the Gods.
(6.) See, for example, Anthony Bonanno, ed., Archaeology and the Fertility Cult in the Ancient Mediterranean (Malta: University of Malta Press, 1986) pp.
However, without engaging with and empowering the local practitioners, the state agent created an illusive image of the Festival associated with a primitive fertility cult, sexual promiscuity and sacred remembrance.
Produced especially for her by Sephardic rabbis who served as hereditary guardians of the monument, the amulet is the "earliest concrete evidence of a fertility cult" at this Bethlehem pilgrimage site (p.
Associated with a prehistoric fertility cult, what is the name of the hill figure near Dorchester, Dorset?
He was convinced that Jesus Christ never existed but was an analogy for the Fly Agaric mushroom, around which the activities of an ancient fertility cult revolved.
Not the imprint of the body itself most of the time, but the imprint of the pictograph, first drawn naively as a kind of folded mandorla that contained nothing but itself, and then multiplied in a fertility cult of the image as prolific as the mass culture of the mechanical reproduction with which it disseminates itself.
It was a species of fertility cult, guided by Druids and celebrating spring and harvest, with appropriate rites to assure abundance of lambs and "corn" (grain).