fescennine


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fes·cen·nine

 (fĕs′ə-nīn′, -nēn′)
adj.
Licentious; obscene.

[Latin Fescennīnus, of Fescennia, a town of ancient Etruria known for its licentious poetry.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Fescennine

(ˈfɛsɪˌnaɪn)
adj
rare scurrilous or obscene
[C17: from Latin Fescennīnus of Fescennia, a city in Etruria noted for the production of mocking or obscene verse]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fes•cen•nine

(ˈfɛs əˌnaɪn, -nɪn)

adj.
scurrilous; licentious; obscene: fescennine humor.
[1595–1605; < Latin Fescennīnus of, belonging to Fescennia, a town in Etruria noted for jesting and scurrilous verse]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

Fescennine

adjective
Offensive to accepted standards of decency:
Slang: raunchy.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The so-called love affair for them is nothing but fescennine or even obscene sexual intercourse.
The constitution hullabaloo goes against the grain, a fescennine mockery of justice.
He comes downtown to the Village only to discover that the kinds of sexual immersions he has sought might better be appreciated in the fescennine novels of Rabelais, which he has left on his shelves uptown.