emphysema

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emphysema
top: normal bronchiole and alveoli
bottom: diseased bronchiole with mucus, enlarged air sacs in the alveoli, and fewer capillaries

em·phy·se·ma

 (ĕm′fĭ-sē′mə, -zē′-)
n.
1. A pathological condition of the lungs marked by an abnormal increase in the size of the air spaces, resulting in labored breathing and an increased susceptibility to infection. It can be caused by irreversible expansion of the alveoli or by the destruction of alveolar walls.
2. An abnormal distension of body tissues caused by retention of air.

[Greek emphūsēma, inflation, from emphūsān, to blow in : en-, in; see en-2 + phūsān, to blow (from phūsa, bellows, bladder).]

em′phy·sem′a·tous (-sĕm′ə-təs, -sē′mə-, -zĕm′ə-, -zē′mə-) adj.
em′phy·se′mic adj. & n.

emphysema

(ˌɛmfɪˈsiːmə)
n
1. (Pathology) Also called: pulmonary emphysema a condition in which the air sacs of the lungs are grossly enlarged, causing breathlessness and wheezing
2. (Pathology) the abnormal presence of air in a tissue or part
[C17: from New Latin, from Greek emphusēma, a swelling up, from emphusan to inflate, from phusan to blow]
emphysematous adj

em•phy•se•ma

(ˌɛm fəˈsi mə, -ˈzi-)

n.
1. a chronic disease of the lungs characterized by difficulty in breathing due to abnormal enlargement and loss of elasticity of the air spaces.
2. any abnormal distention of an organ or part of the body with air or other gas.
[1655–65; < New Latin < Greek emphysēma=emphȳsē-, variant s. of emphȳsân to blow up, inflate + -ma n. suffix of result]
em`phy•sem′a•tous (-ˈsɛm ə təs, -ˈsi mə-, -ˈzɛm ə-, -ˈzi mə-) adj.
em`phy•se′mic, adj.

em·phy·se·ma

(ĕm′fĭ-sē′mə)
A chronic disease in which the small air sacs of the lungs (called alveoli) become enlarged and eventually collapse, causing blockage to the flow of air. Symptoms include difficulty breathing and loss of physical endurance. Emphysema can be caused by excessive smoking.

emphysema


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A disease in which the alveoli (tiny air sacs) of the lungs are damaged. Their separating walls are destroyed and the alveoli are enlarged. This leads to a decrease in the surface area available for gas exchange, and breathing becomes very difficult. The major cause of emphysema is tobacco smoking, but pollution and hereditary factors may also be involved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.emphysema - an abnormal condition of the lungs marked by decreased respiratory functionemphysema - an abnormal condition of the lungs marked by decreased respiratory function; associated with smoking or chronic bronchitis or old age
respiratory disease, respiratory disorder, respiratory illness - a disease affecting the respiratory system
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - a nonreversible lung disease that is a combination of emphysema and chronic bronchitis; usually patients have been heavy cigarette smokers
Translations
emfyzém
emfüseem

emphysema

[emfɪˈsiːmə] Nenfisema m

emphysema

[ˌɛmfɪˈsiːmə] nemphysème m
to suffer from emphysema → avoir de l'emphysème

emphysema

[ɛmfɪˈsiːmə] n (Med) → enfisema m

em·phy·se·ma

n. enfisema, enfermedad crónica pulmonar en la cual los alvéolos pulmonares se distienden y los tejidos localizados entre los mismos se atrofian y dificultan el proceso respiratorio;
___ heartcorazón enfisematoso.

emphysema

n enfisema m
References in periodicals archive ?
Delay in treatment may lead to fetal death and subsequent complications such as fetal emphysema, maceration, septicemia due to bacterial or viral infection and death of dam (Brar, 1994 and Roberts, 2004).
dystokia in treatment methods Medicinal + Forced extraction No of Complications animals 1 Uterine torsion 22 5 2 Uterine inertia 20 3 3 Insufficient 13 4 cervical dilation 4 Narrowed pelvic 1 -- cavity 5 Hydropsy 6 2 6 Abdominal 4 1 inability to strain 7 Over fat -- -- 8 Fetal 27 5 maldisposition 9 Fetal emphysema 16 6 10 Fetal oversize 33 3 11 Congenital 14 2 defects 12 Mummified/ 3 2 macerated 13 Twins 6 2 Total 165 35 Sl.
12 percent while those of head and limb maldisposition were 40 and 60 percent and fetal emphysema (Fig.