hydrops

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Related to fetal hydrops: chorioamnionitis

hydrops

(ˈhaɪdrɒps)
n
1. (Medicine) a swelling caused by excessive fluid in cells or tissues
2. (Medicine) a severe swelling of the entire body caused by excess fluid and accompanied by anaemia, occurring in foetuses and newborns affected by haemolytic disease. Also called: fetal hydrops or hydrops fetalis
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hydrops - swelling from excessive accumulation of watery fluid in cells, tissues, or serous cavitieshydrops - swelling from excessive accumulation of watery fluid in cells, tissues, or serous cavities
angioedema, atrophedema, giant hives, periodic edema, Quincke's edema - recurrent large circumscribed areas of subcutaneous edema; onset is sudden and it disappears within 24 hours; seen mainly in young women, often as an allergic reaction to food or drugs
lymphedema - swelling (usually in the legs) caused by lymph accumulating in the tissues in the affected areas
scleredema - a skin disease marked by hard edema of the tissue usually beginning in the face
cystoid macular edema - a specific pattern of swelling in the central retina
puffiness, swelling, lump - an abnormal protuberance or localized enlargement
anasarca - generalized edema with accumulation of serum in subcutaneous connective tissue
chemosis - edema of the mucous membrane of the eyeball and eyelid lining
papilledema - swelling of the optic disc (where the optic nerve enters the eyeball); usually associated with an increase in intraocular pressure
brain edema, cerebral edema - swelling of the brain due to the uptake of water in the neuropile and white matter
Translations

hy·drops

n. hidropesía, hidropsia o edema.
References in periodicals archive ?
PA/IVS may result in fetal hydrops and even intrauterine death.
On the other hand, in recipients the main problem is hypervolemia, myocardial hypertrophy, and high cardiac output, which potentially could progress to fetal hydrops. The effect of the above findings hemodynamically increases the preload and further impairs ventricular filling.
In monochorionic twin pregnancy, two conditions that may progress to fetal hydrops are twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome and acardiac twin, also known as twin reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) sequence.
We describe a case of PLGD presenting prenatally with thrombocytopenia, transfusion-refractory severe anemia, and non-immune fetal hydrops. These clinical features were initially suspected to be due to a primary bone marrow disorder.
assessment of fetal growth, fetal cardiac rhabdomy-oma (4x3.5 cm) (Figure 2) with other features of fetal hydrops (ascites, pericardial effusion, scalp edema, abdominal wall edema) was detected.
Fetal and obstetric reported complications include fetomaternal haemorrhage, placental abruption, fetal hydrops, anaemia, intrauterine growth restriction, and fetal death [1, 2, 5, 9,12].
Monitoring with frequent ultrasound examinations is recommended to detect early signs of fetal thyroid dysfunction such as the presence of fetal goiter, fetal tachycardia, intrauterine growth restriction, accelerated bone maturation, signs of congestive heart failure, and fetal hydrops (3).
Fetal hydrops was the end result of a serious problem in utero that could not have developed during the hours of labor and delivery; it most likely arose days to weeks before delivery.
IV Fetal hydrops Abnomal collection of fluid in at least two different fetal organ spaces (in one or both twins).
Patients with their blood pressure and plasma random glucose checked and a history of hypertension, diabetes, previous adverse fetal outcome, intrauterine growth retardation and fetal hydrops were sought.