fetter


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Related to fetter: Ebenezer

fet·ter

 (fĕt′ər)
n.
1. A device, usually one of a pair of rings connected to a chain, that is attached to the ankles or feet to restrict movement.
2. often fetters Something that serves to restrict; a restraint: the fetters of tyranny.
tr.v. fet·tered, fet·ter·ing, fet·ters
1. To put fetters on; shackle.
2. To restrict or restrain: thinking that is fettered by prejudice. See Synonyms at hobble.

[Middle English feter, from Old English; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]

fetter

(ˈfɛtə)
n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) (often plural) a chain or bond fastened round the ankle; shackle
2. (usually plural) a check or restraint: the fetters of social convention.
vb (tr)
3. to restrict or confine
4. to bind in fetters
[Old English fetor; related to Old Norse fjöturr fetter, Old High German fezzera, Latin pedica fetter, impedīre to hinder]
ˈfetterer n
ˈfetterless adj

fet•ter

(ˈfɛt ər)

n.
1. a chain or shackle placed on the feet.
2. Usu., fetters. anything that confines or restrains.
v.t.
3. to put fetters upon.
4. to confine; restrain.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English feter; c. Old High German fezzera, Old Norse fjǫturr; akin to foot]
fet′ter•er, n.

fetter


Past participle: fettered
Gerund: fettering

Imperative
fetter
fetter
Present
I fetter
you fetter
he/she/it fetters
we fetter
you fetter
they fetter
Preterite
I fettered
you fettered
he/she/it fettered
we fettered
you fettered
they fettered
Present Continuous
I am fettering
you are fettering
he/she/it is fettering
we are fettering
you are fettering
they are fettering
Present Perfect
I have fettered
you have fettered
he/she/it has fettered
we have fettered
you have fettered
they have fettered
Past Continuous
I was fettering
you were fettering
he/she/it was fettering
we were fettering
you were fettering
they were fettering
Past Perfect
I had fettered
you had fettered
he/she/it had fettered
we had fettered
you had fettered
they had fettered
Future
I will fetter
you will fetter
he/she/it will fetter
we will fetter
you will fetter
they will fetter
Future Perfect
I will have fettered
you will have fettered
he/she/it will have fettered
we will have fettered
you will have fettered
they will have fettered
Future Continuous
I will be fettering
you will be fettering
he/she/it will be fettering
we will be fettering
you will be fettering
they will be fettering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been fettering
you have been fettering
he/she/it has been fettering
we have been fettering
you have been fettering
they have been fettering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been fettering
you will have been fettering
he/she/it will have been fettering
we will have been fettering
you will have been fettering
they will have been fettering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been fettering
you had been fettering
he/she/it had been fettering
we had been fettering
you had been fettering
they had been fettering
Conditional
I would fetter
you would fetter
he/she/it would fetter
we would fetter
you would fetter
they would fetter
Past Conditional
I would have fettered
you would have fettered
he/she/it would have fettered
we would have fettered
you would have fettered
they would have fettered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fetter - a shackle for the ankles or feetfetter - a shackle for the ankles or feet  
hamper, shackle, trammel, bond - a restraint that confines or restricts freedom (especially something used to tie down or restrain a prisoner)
Verb1.fetter - restrain with fetters
handcuff, manacle, cuff - confine or restrain with or as if with manacles or handcuffs; "The police handcuffed the suspect at the scene of the crime"
restrain, confine, hold - to close within bounds, limit or hold back from movement; "This holds the local until the express passengers change trains"; "About a dozen animals were held inside the stockade"; "The illegal immigrants were held at a detention center"; "The terrorists held the journalists for ransom"

fetter

verb
1. restrict, bind, confine, curb, restrain, hamstring, hamper, encumber, clip someone's wings, trammel, straiten He would not be fettered by bureaucracy.
2. chain, tie, tie up, shackle, hobble, hold captive, manacle, gyve (archaic), put a straitjacket on My foes fettered me hand and foot.
plural noun
1. restraints, checks, curbs, constraints, captivity, obstructions, bondage, hindrances without the fetters of restrictive rules
2. chains, bonds, irons, shackles, manacles, leg irons, gyves (archaic), bilboes He saw a boy in fetters in the dungeon.

fetter

noun
Something that physically confines the legs or arms:
bond, chain (used in plural), handcuff (often used in plural), hobble, iron (used in plural), manacle, restraint, shackle.
Archaic: gyve.
verb
To restrict the activity or free movement of:
Informal: hog-tie.
Translations
قُيود، أغْلاليُقَيِّد، يُكَبِّل
poutopřipoutatřetězsvázat
bindelænke
FesselfesselnFußschellen
kahleet
lábbilincsláncbéklyóbéklyózbilincs
fjötra, hlekkjahlekkir, fótajárn
pančiotipantis
iekalt važāspineklissapītvalgivažas
ayak zinciriprangazincire vurmak

fetter

[ˈfetəʳ] VT [+ person] → encadenar, poner grilletes a; [+ horse] → trabar (fig) → poner trabas a

fetter

[ˈfɛtər] vt (= hamper) → entraver

fetter

vt prisonerfesseln; goatanpflocken; (fig)in Fesseln legen
n fetters pl(Fuß)fesseln pl; (fig)Fesseln pl; to put a prisoner in fetterseinen Gefangenen in Fesseln legen

fetter

[ˈfɛtəʳ] vt (person) → incatenare (fig) → ostacolare

fetter

(ˈfetə) noun
a chain that holds the foot or feet of a prisoner, animal etc to prevent running away. The prisoner was in fetters.
verb
to fasten with a fetter. She fettered the horse.
References in classic literature ?
First they removed all his weapons and then, snapping a fetter about one of the rykor's ankles, secured him to the end of one of the chains hanging from the walls.
Chain cables and stout ropes keep her bound to stone posts at the edge of a paved shore, and a berthing-master, with brass buttons on his coat, walks about like a weather-beaten and ruddy gaoler, casting jealous, watchful glances upon the moorings that fetter a ship lying passive and still and safe, as if lost in deep regrets of her days of liberty and danger on the sea.
You know a distribution of labor is the source of all civilization--that trade is an exchange of equivalents--that custom-houses fetter these equivalents--that nothing which is fettered is free--"
No way but to fetter 'em; got legs,--they'll use 'em,--no mistake.
He is of the same mind as the old poet Davenant who thought it folly to take away the liberty of a poet and fetter his feet in the shackles of an historian.
To Tardos Mors I went first, asking where the keys might be which would unfasten their fetters.
I do not remember now the details of the weight and length of the fetters riveted on his limbs by an "Administrative" order, but it was in the number of pounds and the thickness of links an appalling assertion of the divine right of autocracy.
The clanking of fetters and the rattling of chains in the prison, and the pious psalm and solemn prayer in the church, may be heard at the same time.
But strangely enough I did not falter in my allegiance to him, or realize that here in this free form was a deliverance, if I liked, from the fetters and manacles which I had been at so much pains to fit myself with.
Many a one cannot loosen his own fetters, but is nevertheless his friend's emancipator.
At a certain stage in the development of these means of production and of exchange, the conditions under which feudal society produced and exchanged, the feudal organisation of agriculture and manufacturing industry, in one word, the feudal relations of property became no longer compatible with the already developed productive forces; they became so many fetters.
As several gentlemen in these times, by the wonderful force of genius only, without the least assistance of learning, perhaps, without being well able to read, have made a considerable figure in the republic of letters; the modern critics, I am told, have lately begun to assert, that all kind of learning is entirely useless to a writer; and, indeed, no other than a kind of fetters on the natural sprightliness and activity of the imagination, which is thus weighed down, and prevented from soaring to those high flights which otherwise it would be able to reach.