feudal


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Related to feudal: feudal lord, feudal system

feu·dal

 (fyo͞od′l)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of feudalism.
2. Of or relating to lands held in fee or to the holding of such lands.

feu′dal·ly adv.

feudal

(ˈfjuːdəl)
adj
1. (Historical Terms) of, resembling, relating to, or characteristic of feudalism or its institutions
2. (Historical Terms) of, characteristic of, or relating to a fief. Compare allodial
3. derogatory old-fashioned, reactionary, etc
[C17: from Medieval Latin feudālis, from feudum feud2]

feudal

(ˈfjuːdəl)
adj
of or relating to a feud or quarrel

feu•dal

(ˈfyud l)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or like the feudal system.
2. of or pertaining to the Middle Ages.
3. of or pertaining to a fief or to the holding of a fief.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin feudālis]
feu′dal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.feudal - of or relating to or characteristic of feudalism
Translations
إقْطاعي
feudální
feudalfeudalistisk
feudális
léns-
feodalinisfeodalizmas
feodāls
feudálny
derebeyliğe ait

feudal

[ˈfjuːdl]
A. ADJfeudal
B. CPD feudal system Nfeudalismo m

feudal

[ˈfjuːdəl] adj [system] → féodal(e); [lord, baron] → féodal(e)

feudal

adjFeudal-, feudal; feudal systemFeudalsystem nt; feudal landownerFeudal- or Lehnsherr m

feudal

[ˈfjuːdl] adjfeudale

feudal

(ˈfjuːdl) adjective
of the system by which people gave certain services eg military support to a more powerful man in return for lands, protection etc.
ˈfeudalism noun
References in classic literature ?
In ancient Rome we have patricians, knights, plebeians, slaves; in the Middle Ages, feudal lords, vassals, guild-masters, journeymen, apprentices, serfs; in almost all of these classes, again, subordinate gradations.
Though the ancient feudal systems were not, strictly speaking, confederacies, yet they partook of the nature of that species of association.
The situation of the inferior gentry, or Franklins, as they were called, who, by the law and spirit of the English constitution, were entitled to hold themselves independent of feudal tyranny, became now unusually precarious.
On these occasions might be seen the change since the unceremonious times of the old French traders; now the aristocratic character of the Briton shone forth magnificently, or rather the feudal spirit of the Highlander.
Some demon had whispe red to Lady Lundie to cultivate a taste for feudal antiquities, and to insist on spreading that taste among her guests.
Far back in the twilight of history, at least 1,700 years before Christ, the Chinese people sang their songs of kings and feudal princes good or bad, of husbandry, or now and then songs with the more personal note of simple joys and sorrows.
Those bands of them with whom we are here concerned, and who became known distinctively as Normans, fastened themselves as settlers, early in the eleventh century, on the northern shore of France, and in return for their acceptance of Christianity and acknowledgment of the nominal feudal sovereignty of the French king were recognized as rightful possessors of the large province which thus came to bear the name of Normandy.
But when the army is restless and distrustful, trouble is sure to come from the other feudal princes.
The Chateau du Glandier is one of the oldest chateaux in the Ile de France, where so many building remains of the feudal period are still standing.
This was destroyed by fire in 1543, and some of its smoke-blackened corner stones were used when, in Jacobean times, a brick country house rose upon the ruins of the feudal castle.
In the feudal system, we have seen a similar propensity exemplified.
During three hundred years their domains had gradually contracted, sometimes through royal or feudal encroachment, and sometimes through such gifts to the Church as that with which Alleyne's father had opened the doors of Beaulieu Abbey to his younger son.