fiction


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fic·tion

 (fĭk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The category of literature, drama, film, or other creative work whose content is imagined and is not necessarily based on fact.
b. Works in this category: the fiction of Virginia Woolf.
c. A work within this category: the shorter fictions of Faulkner.
2.
a. Narrative, explanatory material, or belief that is not true or has been imagined or fabricated: The notion that he was at the scene of the crime is pure fiction.
b. A narrative, explanation, or belief that may seem true but is false or fabricated: "Neutrality is a fiction in an unneutral world" (Howard Zinn).
3. Law A verbal contrivance that is in some sense inaccurate but that accomplishes a purpose, as in the treatment of husband and wife as one person or a corporation as an entity.

[Middle English ficcioun, from Old French fiction, from Latin fictiō, fictiōn-, from fictus, past participle of fingere, to form; see dheigh- in Indo-European roots.]

fic′tion·al adj.
fic′tion·al′i·ty (-shə-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
fic′tion·al·ly adv.

fiction

(ˈfɪkʃən)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) literary works invented by the imagination, such as novels or short stories
2. an invented story or explanation; lie
3. the act of inventing a story or explanation
4. (Law) law something assumed to be true for the sake of convenience, though probably false
[C14: from Latin fictiō a fashioning, hence something imaginary, from fingere to shape]
ˈfictional adj
ˈfictionally adv
ˌfictionˈeer, ˈfictionist n

fic•tion

(ˈfɪk ʃən)

n.
1. the class of literature comprising works of imaginative narration, esp. in prose form.
2. works of this class, as novels or short stories.
3. something feigned, invented, or imagined, esp. a made-up story.
4. the act of feigning, inventing, or imagining.
5. an assumption that a fact exists, regardless of the truth of the matter, so that a legal principle can be applied on the basis of the existing facts.
[1375–1425; < Latin fictiō action of shaping, feigning, fiction, derivative of fingere to shape]
fic′tion•al, adj.
fic′tion•al•ly, adv.

fiction

Literature, especially stories, based on invented character and incidents—though fiction may often be set against a background of real events and draw on real-life experience.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on factfiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
literary composition, literary work - imaginative or creative writing
dystopia - a work of fiction describing an imaginary place where life is extremely bad because of deprivation or oppression or terror
novel - an extended fictional work in prose; usually in the form of a story
fantasy, phantasy - fiction with a large amount of imagination in it; "she made a lot of money writing romantic fantasies"
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
utopia - a work of fiction describing a utopia
2.fiction - a deliberately false or improbable accountfiction - a deliberately false or improbable account
falsehood, untruth, falsity - a false statement
canard - a deliberately misleading fabrication

fiction

noun
1. tale, story, novel, legend, myth, romance, fable, storytelling, narration, creative writing, work of imagination She is a writer of historical fiction.
2. imagination, fancy, fantasy, creativity a story of truth or fiction
3. lie, fancy, fantasy, invention, improvisation, fabrication, concoction, falsehood, untruth, porky (Brit. slang), pork pie (Brit. slang), urban myth, tall story, urban legend, cock and bull story (informal), figment of the imagination Total recycling is a fiction.
Quotations
"'Tis strange - but true; for truth is always strange;"
"Stranger than fiction" [Lord Byron Don Juan]
"Truth may be stranger than fiction, but fiction is truer" [Frederic Raphael Contemporary Novelists]
"Literature is a luxury. Fiction is a necessity" [G.K. Chesterton The Defendant]

fiction

noun
1. An illusory mental image:
2. Any fictitious idea accepted as part of an ideology by an uncritical group; a received idea:
4. A narrative not based on fact:
Translations
beletriefikce
fiktionskønlitteratur
kaunokirjallisuussepitetarufiktio
fikcija
regényirodalom
skáldskapur
フィクション
소설
grožinė literatūraišgalvotas
daiļliteratūraizdomājums
beletria
leposlovje
skönlitteratur
นวนิยาย
hayâl ürünü öykükurgu
tiểu thuyết

fiction

[ˈfɪkʃən] N
1. (Literat) → literatura f de ficción, narrativa f
a work of fictionuna obra de ficción
2. (= untruth) → ficción f, invención f

fiction

[ˈfɪkʃən] n
(= literary work) → fiction f
historical fiction → fiction historique
a work of fiction → une œuvre de fiction
(= invention) → fiction f
Total recycling is a fiction → L'idée de tout recycler relève de la fiction.

fiction

n
no pl (Liter) → Erzähl- or Prosaliteratur f; you’ll find that under fictiondas finden Sie unter Belletristik; work of fictionErzählung f; (longer) → Roman m; light fiction(leichte) Unterhaltungsliteratur; romantic fictionLiebesromane pl
(= invention)(freie) Erfindung, Fiktion f; that’s pure fictiondas ist frei erfunden; total recycling is a fictiondas totale Recycling gibt es nicht

fiction

[ˈfɪkʃn] n
a. (Literature) → narrativa
a work of fiction → un'opera di narrativa
light fiction → narrativa leggera
b. (sth made up) → finzione f

fiction

(ˈfikʃən) noun
stories etc which tell of imagined, not real, characters and events (see also non-fiction). I prefer reading fiction to hearing about real events.
ˈfictional adjective
fictitious (fikˈtiʃəs) adjective
1. not true. a fictitious account.
2. not real or based on fact. All the characters in the book are fictitious.

fiction

قِصَّةٌ خَيَالِيَّة beletrie fiktion Belletristik πεζογραφία ficción kaunokirjallisuus fiction fikcija fiction フィクション 소설 fictie fiksjon fikcja ficção художественная литература skönlitteratur นวนิยาย kurgu tiểu thuyết 小说
References in periodicals archive ?
Critique: Chapters cover a wide range of issues affecting the art of fiction writing, from how to make dialogue sound natural (and properly punctuate it), to using attributions to control rhythm and pace, to effectively using both action and dialogue to advance the plot, and much more.
That fiction books really should be called 'non non-fiction', but then I suppose that really is quite silly.
Reading Science Fiction is no different in this regard.
Even from a first glance at the title of Warren Motte's text Fiction Now, many readers and critics may well pause before the elusive term now, for they may associate it with the difficulties inherent in attempting to pinpoint the current state of French fiction that remains in a continuous cycle of regeneration.
The first three chapters treat the same spans of history, emphasizing different decades and developments, and, though seemingly redundant, they also provide distinctly different perspectives and include notably unique details, so that the effect is of a cumulative appreciation of the struggles of the writers and editors who created the science fiction genre.
Not all science fiction has religious undertones, but there can be similarities between science fiction and religion.
Deriding the idea of fanfic as good training for writers, Hobb wrote, "Fan fiction allows the writer to pretend to be creating a story, while using someone else's world, characters, and plot.
Brigg draws the parameters of span fiction early in the book, asserting that "Science and its muscular sibling, technology, have transformed the world and the way human beings see it and behave in it:" As a consequence, both mainstream fiction and science fiction have seen their boundaries weakened; a number of mainstream fiction writers, Brigg says, "have now turned to explore strange horizons and find opportunities to express parts of their vision that realms new to them (but the stock-in-trade of the science fiction writer) will permit" (5).
The convention, hosted by the North Hollywood-based Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, highlights ``Exploring the Golden Ages of Science Fiction.
I'm a journalist by trade and a fiction writer by heart.
Feminist idolatry--an idol is anything put in importance over God and His Word--chronically communicates the misuse of artistic fiction.