fictional


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Related to fictional: Fictional characters, Fictional story

fic·tion

 (fĭk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The category of literature, drama, film, or other creative work whose content is imagined and is not necessarily based on fact.
b. Works in this category: the fiction of Virginia Woolf.
c. A work within this category: the shorter fictions of Faulkner.
2.
a. Narrative, explanatory material, or belief that is not true or has been imagined or fabricated: The notion that he was at the scene of the crime is pure fiction.
b. A narrative, explanation, or belief that may seem true but is false or fabricated: "Neutrality is a fiction in an unneutral world" (Howard Zinn).
3. Law A verbal contrivance that is in some sense inaccurate but that accomplishes a purpose, as in the treatment of husband and wife as one person or a corporation as an entity.

[Middle English ficcioun, from Old French fiction, from Latin fictiō, fictiōn-, from fictus, past participle of fingere, to form; see dheigh- in Indo-European roots.]

fic′tion·al adj.
fic′tion·al′i·ty (-shə-năl′ĭ-tē) n.
fic′tion·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fictional

fictitious
1. 'fictional'

A fictional character, thing, or event occurs in a story, play, or film, and has never actually existed or happened.

I had to put myself into the position of lots of fictional characters.
...a musical about a fictional composer called Moony Shapiro.

Fictional also means 'relating to fiction and the telling of stories'.

James Joyce's final fictional experiment was a novel composed entirely of mathematical equations.
2. 'fictitious'

Something that is fictitious is false and is intended to deceive people.

They bought the materials under fictitious names.
Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fictional - related to or involving literary fiction; "clever fictional devices"; "a fictional treatment of the train robbery"
nonfictional - not fictional
2.fictional - formed or conceived by the imagination; "a fabricated excuse for his absence"; "a fancied wrong"; "a fictional character"
unreal - lacking in reality or substance or genuineness; not corresponding to acknowledged facts or criteria; "ghosts and other unreal entities"; "unreal propaganda serving as news"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

fictional

adjective imaginary, made-up, invented, legendary, unreal, nonexistent a drama featuring fictional characters
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

fictional

adjective
Consisting or suggestive of fiction:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
خيالي
smyšlený
fiktiv
erdichtetfiktional
képzeltköltöttregényes
skáldaîur, skáldskapar-
izmišljen
düşselhayâlî

fictional

[ˈfɪkʃənl] ADJficticio
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fictional

[ˈfɪkʃənəl] adj [character, place] → fictif/ive
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fictional

adj
(= invented)erfunden; (Liter) character, hero, heroine, setting, accounterfunden, fiktiv; film, dramafiktional; entirely fictionalrein fiktiv, frei erfunden; the party’s unity was fictionaldie Einheit der Partei war eine Fiktion
(= relating to fiction) workerzählerisch; his fictional writingseine erzählenden Schriften; a clever fictional deviceein geschickter erzählerischer Trick; a fictional representation of historical eventseine dichterische Darstellung historischer Ereignisse
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fictional

[ˈfɪkʃənl] adjimmaginario/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

fiction

(ˈfikʃən) noun
stories etc which tell of imagined, not real, characters and events (see also non-fiction). I prefer reading fiction to hearing about real events.
ˈfictional adjective
fictitious (fikˈtiʃəs) adjective
1. not true. a fictitious account.
2. not real or based on fact. All the characters in the book are fictitious.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Daily Record asked several top Maryland lawyers who are their favorite fictional lawyer.
We always dream of being able to buy our ideal house one day, but what if we could by our dream fictional home, from some of our favourite films?
The TV network earlier defended its "fictional" program, stressing that the show is not meant to put the PNP in bad light.
The first episode will introduce viewers to the rebooted characters and the new cast, as well as establish the fictional universe it's all set in, which happens to be the same one that encompasses the "(https://www.ibtimes.com/cbs-explains-hawaii-five-0-diversity-daniel-dae-kim-grace-parks-shocking-exit-2573275) Hawaii Five-0 " reboot.
Summary: London [UK], August 9 (ANI): Many Real Madrid players, including Dani Carvajal and Theo Hernandez, have welcomed the signing of Alex Hunter, who is a fictional character in the FIFA game series.
Creating Identity in the Victorian Fictional Autobiography
Filmmaker Rajkumar Hirani, who is busy with the post-production process of his upcoming film based on the life of actor Sanjay Dutt, says biopics are more interesting when presented in a fictional format.
In order to prepare individuals and minimize loss of life, Homeland Security and other organizations have developed training videos that show non-fictional (real-world) and fictional (dramatized) portrayals of active shooters.
Which fictional "superheroine" is the alter-ego of Barbara Gordon?
Now, it can even be used to locate the real-life location of fictional landmarks.
Fictional writing often is produced as a story meant to entertain or convey an author's point of view.