fig wasp


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fig wasp

n.
Any of various chalcid wasps that breed in figs, especially those in the family Agaonidae that have a mutualistic relationship with fig plants, acting as the sole pollinator and developing inside the fruit.

fig′ wasp`


n.
a chalcid wasp, Blastophaga psenes, that pollinates figs, usu. of the Smyrna variety.
[1880–85]
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References in periodicals archive ?
But the figs are pollinated by the fig wasp and rely on the insect to produce their seeds.
A living fossil Tetrapus fig wasp (Hymenoptera: Agaoninae) developing in extant Neotropical fig species (Moraceae: Ficus, section Pharmacosycea)
The non-pollinating agaonid fig wasp, Josephiella microcarpae Beardsley & Rasplus (Hymenoptera: Agaonidae), which forms galls on the leaves of F.
Pollinator fig wasp foundresses enter the figs in order to lay their eggs in, and gall, the ovules that line the inner surface of the fig.
Little is known about the reproductive aspects of this plant, although there is one report of two Pegoscapus Cameron (1906) species of fig wasp, simultaneously occurring in its syconiums (Schiffler, 2002).
Washington, June 16 (ANI): World's oldest fig wasp fossil, found on the Isle of Wight, proves that this tiny, specialised insect has remained virtually unchanged for more than 34 million years.
The fig wasp fauna of the receptacles of Ficus thonningii (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea).
In this paper, we adopt the second approach and compare the phenotypic variance in offspring sex ratios produced by females of different pollinating fig wasp species when they enter a fruit and oviposit alone (defined as single foundress sex ratio).
Sperm morphology: a novel way to associate female-males of highly sexual dimorphic fig wasp species.
As the trees are only pollinated by the fig wasp Ceratosolen arabicus, the scientists were able to map the distances travelled by the insects.
Multiple fig wasp foundress broods generally showed more females than the unadjusted model predicted (Hamilton 1979, Frank 1983b, cited by Herre et al.
But the fig wasp parasites, rather than competing with their hosts for resources committed solely to reproduction, actually consume their hosts and only emerge after the host has died.