fig wasp


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fig wasp

n.
Any of various chalcid wasps that breed in figs, especially those in the family Agaonidae that have a mutualistic relationship with fig plants, acting as the sole pollinator and developing inside the fruit.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fig′ wasp`


n.
a chalcid wasp, Blastophaga psenes, that pollinates figs, usu. of the Smyrna variety.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Determinants of species richness in southern African fig wasp assemblages.
(2010a) have shown host-switching of some Schistonchus lineages in Australia where there is evidence of long term incursions of apparently Laurasian Ficus lineages and their associated fig wasps and nematodes supporting the possibility of nematode host-switching as fig wasp lineages are moved into new areas.
For example, each fig species tends to be pollinated by a single fig wasp such that the loss of one should result in the loss of the other.
She fields questions from a stick insect whose lover is obsessed with her, a fig wasp that laments that all the males she knows bite their girlfriends in half, and a lion bemoaning the fact that his mate is a nymphomaniac.
Fig trees are special because they are pollinated by a specific fig wasp.angered
A living fossil Tetrapus fig wasp (Hymenoptera: Agaoninae) developing in extant Neotropical fig species (Moraceae: Ficus, section Pharmacosycea)
The non-pollinating agaonid fig wasp, Josephiella microcarpae Beardsley & Rasplus (Hymenoptera: Agaonidae), which forms galls on the leaves of F.
Globalization of invasive fig wasp species is mediated through the horticulture and bonsai trade, with the spread of fig wasp species outside their natural range likely to be facilitated by accidental transfer of their larvae inside figs as part of international trade of the host fig species.
Little is known about the reproductive aspects of this plant, although there is one report of two Pegoscapus Cameron (1906) species of fig wasp, simultaneously occurring in its syconiums (Schiffler, 2002).