fig wasp

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fig wasp

n.
Any of various chalcid wasps that breed in figs, especially those in the family Agaonidae that have a mutualistic relationship with fig plants, acting as the sole pollinator and developing inside the fruit.

fig′ wasp`


n.
a chalcid wasp, Blastophaga psenes, that pollinates figs, usu. of the Smyrna variety.
[1880–85]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pellmyr points out that biologists have long used fig wasps to study big questions, such as sex ratios, cheating in partnerships, and formation of new species.
and globeflower flies (Pellmyr 1989, Pellmyr 1992), Ficus and fig wasps (Janzen 1979, Wiebes 1979), and Yucca and yucca moths (Riley 1892).
The nematode parasites of fig wasps exhibit such a combination of vertical and horizontal transmission (Herre 1993).
Maybe some of the specialized relationships like between the figs and fig wasps - aren't so specialized," he added.
Four groups of pollinating floral parasites and their host plants have been studied in some detail, sometimes together with their non-pollinating close relatives: fig wasps and figs (e.
One possible example of the operation of diminishing returns when virulence takes the form of reduced fecundity is the interaction of fig wasps and their nematode parasites studied by Herre (1993).
Contrary to this expectation, there are only two known origins of active pollination in the hundreds of lineages of seed-eating insects, namely in yucca moths and in fig wasps (Bronstein 1992, Pellmyr and Thompson 1992, Powell 1992, Brown et al.
Hamilton (1979) used comparisons among and within species of fig wasps to show that male aggressive behavior and dimorphism (including armed morphs) are related to patterns of kinship within colonies.
Moreover, the same relationship is reported by Herre (1993) in comparing different nematode species that infect fig wasps.
Even stranger, wild figs and some cultivated varieties, called 'Smyrna' figs, need to be pollinated by tiny fig wasps with pollen from male "caprifigs.
As another example, Miller explained how fig wasps lay their eggs, noting that their larvae eat some of the figs.