fight-or-flight response


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fight-or-flight response

(fīt′ôr-flīt′)
n.
A set of physiological changes, such as increases in heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and blood glucose, initiated by the sympathetic nervous system to mobilize body systems in response to stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
Research has shown how the body reacts to stress by activating the adrenal glands, which secrete catecholamine hormones into the bloodstream and trigger the aggressive fight-or-flight response.
When the once frequently needed fight-or-flight response inappropriately triggers to deal with modern stress, it can turn against the body over the long haul.
So the sound of the bell and the sudden opening of the starting gate trigger the animals' natural fight-or-flight response.
A fast pulse, vessel constriction, and high blood pressure are valuable tools in a person's fight-or-flight response.
Likewise, positive self-talk can stop the fight-or-flight response giving you indigestion.
As one of the most ancient parts of the brain and source of the fight-or-flight response, the amygdala has an important role in each of us - it's a critical part of our survival.