figurative

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fig·u·ra·tive

 (fĭg′yər-ə-tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Based on or making use of figures of speech; metaphorical: figurative language.
b. Containing many figures of speech; ornate.
2. Represented by a figure or resemblance; symbolic or emblematic.
3. Of or relating to artistic representation by means of animal or human figures.

fig′u·ra·tive·ly adv.
fig′u·ra·tive·ness n.

figurative

(ˈfɪɡərətɪv)
adj
1. (Rhetoric) of the nature of, resembling, or involving a figure of speech; not literal; metaphorical
2. (Rhetoric) using or filled with figures of speech
3. (Art Terms) representing by means of an emblem, likeness, figure, etc
4. (Art Terms) (in painting, sculpture, etc) of, relating to, or characterized by the naturalistic representation of the external world
ˈfiguratively adv
ˈfigurativeness n

fig•ur•a•tive

(ˈfɪg yər ə tɪv)

adj.
1. of the nature of or involving a figure of speech, esp. a metaphor; metaphorical; not literal.
2. characterized by or abounding in figures of speech.
3. representing by means of a figure or likeness, as in drawing or sculpture.
4. representing by a figure or emblem; emblematic.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Late Latin]
fig′ur•a•tive•ness, n.

figurative

Representing a human or an animal form.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.figurative - (used of the meanings of words or text) not literal; using figures of speech; "figurative language"
rhetorical - given to rhetoric, emphasizing style at the expense of thought; "mere rhetorical frippery"
literal - limited to the explicit meaning of a word or text; "a literal translation"
2.figurative - consisting of or forming human or animal figures; "a figural design"; "the figurative art of the humanistic tradition"- Herbert Read
representational - (used especially of art) depicting objects, figures,or scenes as seen; "representational art"; "representational images"

figurative

Translations
مَجازي، إسْتِعاري
obrazný
billedlig
képletes
líkinga-; myndrænn; óeiginlegur
obrazný
mecâzi

figurative

[ˈfɪgərətɪv] ADJ
1. [meaning] → figurado; [expression] → metafórico
2. (Art) → figurativo

figurative

[ˈfɪgərətɪv] adj [sense] → figuré(e)
in a figurative sense → au sens figuré

figurative

adj
(= metaphorical) languagebildlich; use, senseübertragen; in a figurative senseim übertragenen Sinn
(Art) art, painting, sculpture, artistgegenständlich

figurative

[ˈfɪgərətɪv] adj (meaning) → figurato/a (Art) → figurativo/a

figure

(ˈfigə) , ((American) ˈfigjər) noun
1. the form or shape of a person. A mysterious figure came towards me; That girl has got a good figure.
2. a (geometrical) shape. The page was covered with a series of triangles, squares and other geometrical figures.
3. a symbol representing a number. a six-figure telephone number.
4. a diagram or drawing to explain something. The parts of a flower are shown in figure 3.
verb
1. to appear (in a story etc). She figures largely in the story.
2. to think, estimate or consider. I figured that you would arrive before half past eight.
ˈfigurative (-rətiv) adjective
of or using figures of speech. figurative language.
ˈfiguratively adverb
ˈfigurehead noun
1. a person who is officially a leader but who does little or has little power. She is the real leader of the party – he is only a figurehead.
2. an ornamental figure (usually of carved wood) attached to the front of a ship.
figure of speech
one of several devices (eg metaphor, simile) for using words not with their ordinary meanings but to make a striking effect.
figure out
to understand. I can't figure out why he said that.
References in classic literature ?
Yet he is much more varied, flexible, and fluent than Johnson or Gibbon, with much greater variety of sentence forms and with far more color, figurativeness and picturesqueness of phrase.
We would not make a mistake attributing aesthetical qualities for the figurativeness and approaching it as the result of creative activeness of consciousness.
A concrete concept is easier to comprehend visually than an abstract concept because it has greater figurativeness.
All the meanings of the 20 PVs (96 in total) were collected from three learners' phrasal verbs dictionaries (Spears 1996; McIntosh 2006; Cambridge Phrasal Verbs Dictionary 2006), and rated for figurativeness by 2 linguists, 5 native speakers and 40 proficient learners of English.
s (2012: 82) view, the widespread occurrence of exocentrism in the world's languages suggests "a relatively strong position of figurativeness in natural languages" on the one hand, and a tendency towards a more speaker-friendly economy of expression (as opposed to a more listener-friendly clarity of expression).
The governing conceit of Keats's letter likens "a life of any worth" to the idea of figurativeness, of which the "Mystery" of scripture is the original instance.
The process described here helps to account for the fact that many catachreses have lost much of their figurativeness, but it would be problematic to say that they are used as literal words because of their forgotten figurativeness.
We perform an interdisciplinary wedding of semiotics to corporeal feminism, of literary theory to readings in visual arts, and of iconography to revisionary interpretations of literature; unveil how the semioticization of female bodies affects the somatization of texts and images; and aim to offer a gender-sensitive analysis of topics like the textual value of illustrations, pictures collaged inside literary texts, the figurativeness of lyrical language and the materiality of signifiers.
It is a fact that teaching idioms has always been very difficult for language teachers due to their figurativeness and opacity.
As Streete acknowledges, such questionings of imaginative images forced Protestant iconoclasts to struggle with the fundamental figurativeness of language itself.
If on one level Carson's response to Barton, the murderer of his son, on Barton's deathbed involves a moment of self-recognition (in looking at Barton he sees himself as if in a mirror, the figurativeness of his role in perpetrating social murder becoming literal in his visual and mental perception), and if Gaskell's industrialist readers identified with Carson, they too on some level of perception must have seen something of themselves while looking through Carson at Barton.