filch


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filch

 (fĭlch)
tr.v. filched, filch·ing, filch·es
To take (something, especially something of little value) in a furtive manner; snitch. See Synonyms at steal.

[Middle English filchen.]

filch′er n.

filch

(fɪltʃ)
vb
(tr) to steal or take surreptitiously in small amounts; pilfer
[C16 filchen to steal, attack, perhaps from Old English gefylce band of men]
ˈfilcher n

filch

(fɪltʃ)

v.t.
to steal (esp. something of small value); pilfer; swipe.
[1250–1300; Middle English]

filch


Past participle: filched
Gerund: filching

Imperative
filch
filch
Present
I filch
you filch
he/she/it filches
we filch
you filch
they filch
Preterite
I filched
you filched
he/she/it filched
we filched
you filched
they filched
Present Continuous
I am filching
you are filching
he/she/it is filching
we are filching
you are filching
they are filching
Present Perfect
I have filched
you have filched
he/she/it has filched
we have filched
you have filched
they have filched
Past Continuous
I was filching
you were filching
he/she/it was filching
we were filching
you were filching
they were filching
Past Perfect
I had filched
you had filched
he/she/it had filched
we had filched
you had filched
they had filched
Future
I will filch
you will filch
he/she/it will filch
we will filch
you will filch
they will filch
Future Perfect
I will have filched
you will have filched
he/she/it will have filched
we will have filched
you will have filched
they will have filched
Future Continuous
I will be filching
you will be filching
he/she/it will be filching
we will be filching
you will be filching
they will be filching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been filching
you have been filching
he/she/it has been filching
we have been filching
you have been filching
they have been filching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been filching
you will have been filching
he/she/it will have been filching
we will have been filching
you will have been filching
they will have been filching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been filching
you had been filching
he/she/it had been filching
we had been filching
you had been filching
they had been filching
Conditional
I would filch
you would filch
he/she/it would filch
we would filch
you would filch
they would filch
Past Conditional
I would have filched
you would have filched
he/she/it would have filched
we would have filched
you would have filched
they would have filched
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.filch - make off with belongings of othersfilch - make off with belongings of others  
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"

filch

verb steal, take, thieve, pinch (informal), lift (informal), nick (slang, chiefly Brit.), trouser (slang), abstract, rip off (slang), cabbage (Brit. slang), swipe (slang), knock off (slang), crib (informal), half-inch (old-fashioned slang), embezzle, pilfer, walk off with, misappropriate, purloin, snaffle (Brit. informal) I filched some notes from his wallet.

filch

verb
To take (another's property) without permission:
Informal: lift, swipe.
Translations
يَخْتَلِس، يَسْرِقُ شيئا قَليل القيمَه
задигамкрада
štípnoutukrást
huggenegle
näpistää
elcsenelemelellopelsinkófál
nukniaukti
nociept
aşırmakçalmak

filch

[fɪltʃ] VT (= steal) → birlar, mangar

filch

[ˈfɪltʃ] vt (= steal) → voler, chiper

filch

vt (inf)filzen, mopsen, mausen (all inf)

filch

[fɪltʃ] vt (fam) (steal) → grattare

filch

(filtʃ) verb
to steal something, especially of little value. Who has filched my pen?
References in classic literature ?
You don't need to be taught how to swindle the master, and to filch fur coats!"
Now in that night Boxtel would climb over the wall and, as he knew the position of the bulb which was to produce the grand black tulip, he would filch it; and instead of flowering for Cornelius, it would flower for him, Isaac; he also, instead of Van Baerle, would have the prize of a hundred thousand guilders, not to speak of the sublime honour of calling the new flower Tulipa nigra Boxtellensis, -- a result which would satisfy not only his vengeance, but also his cupidity and his ambition.
I respect my father more--I mean I despise him less--for doing his own sweating and filching than I do the sensitive sluggards and cowards who lent him their money to sweat and filch with, and asked no questions provided the interest was paid punctually.
Great fangs sunk into the carcass tearing away huge hunks, the mightiest of the apes obtaining the choicest morsels, while the weaker circled the outer edge of the fighting, snarling pack awaiting their chance to dodge in and snatch a dropped tidbit or filch a remaining bone before all was gone.
As before, when Sing had threatened to filch his new possession from him, Number One held the girl with one hand while he met the attack of this new assailant with the other; but here was very different metal than had succumbed to him before.
Many a one hath said: "There hath surely a God filched something from me secretly whilst I slept?
And Saxon, her cheek pressed to his, knew that she was paid in full for all her midnight sewings and the torturing hours of drowsy stitching when her head nodded with the weariness of the day's toil, while she recreated for herself filched ideas from the dainty garments that had steamed under her passing iron.
However, the excuse he offers is at least an excuse; but there is another set of men who are like YOU; they know a WORD here and there, of a foreign language, or a few beggarly little three-word phrases, filched from the back of the Dictionary, and these are continually peppering into their literature, with a pretense of knowing that language--what excuse can they offer?
I waited, ready for him with knife and bludgeon--also filched from a dead foeman; but he paid no attention to me, falling to work instead to devour one of the corpses.
She brought me all my belongings that had been filched from me--rifle, ammunition, knife, and thermos bottle, and then hand in hand we descended the cliff and set off toward the north.
Those who had saved any property were obliged to keep a constant watch, for thieves prowled about, and at each little trembling of the ground, with one hand they beat their breasts and cried "Misericordia!" and then with the other filched what they could from the ruins.
Alan filched away his blunderbuss; and the lawyer, taking him by the arm, plucked him up from the doorstep, led him into the kitchen, whither we all followed, and set him down in a chair beside the hearth, where the fire was out and only a rush-light burning.