filicide

(redirected from filicides)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

filicide

(ˈfɪlɪˌsaɪd)
n
1. the act of killing one's own son or daughter
2. a person who does this
[C17: from Latin fīlius son or fīlia daughter + -cide]
ˌfiliˈcidal adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

filicide

1. a parent who kills a son or daughter.
2. the killing of a son or daughter by a parent. — filicidal, adj.
See also: Children
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.filicide - a parent who murders his own son or daughter
parent - a father or mother; one who begets or one who gives birth to or nurtures and raises a child; a relative who plays the role of guardian
2.filicide - the murder of your own son or daughter
murder, slaying, execution - unlawful premeditated killing of a human being by a human being
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Maternal and paternal filicides: a retrospective review of filicides in Finland.
These deaths, and other paternal filicides, are undeniably distressing for those involved and society as a whole.
Between July 2008 and June 2010, there were 22 filicides recorded in Australia, of which seven involved the death of a child under one year of age.
(GRAPH) Filicides in the U.S.: Percent of homicides of children younger than 5 by a parenta
This is the appropriate category for many filicides that are related to religious conviction, where mothers may believe they must kill their children to protect them from damnation or to exorcise demons from their bodies.
Research in America led to the term 'family annihilator' being coined to describe filicides - people who kill their children.
Just as poverty seldom drove Chicago mothers to kill their children, these filicides were rarely committed by young women struggling with the new pressures of parenthood.
It may be noted that in a British survey (Wilczynski, 1997) of filicides in England and Wales, over half (56.6% of 133) of the deaths were due to females.