filioque


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filioque

(ˌfɪlɪˈəʊkwɪ)
n
a Latin word meaning 'and from the Son', included in the Western version of the Nicene Creed
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4), considering the question of the filioque as a "new doctrine.
In the trinitarian view as held by the Catholic Church, there are some differences, such as the doctrine of filioque, the belief that the Holy Spirit came forth from the Father and the Son.
Julgando-se a maxima autoridade, no seculo XI Roma acrescenta, de forma unilateral e arbitraria, o filioque (5) ao Simbolo de fe do seculo IV (o credo nicenoconstantinopolitano).
Along the way, she treats familiar questions in pneumatology with ecumenical import, such as the filioque, the role of the Spirit in soteriology, and glossolalia and other charismatic gifts.
Indefectiblemente, la gnoseologia individualista altera en Occidente tambien la ontologia de la buena nueva del cristianismo, regresa a la <<pobreza del judaismo monoteista>>, a traves de la comprension de las personas como <<relaciones internas>> de la esencia--a traves del Filioque.
Furthermore, I believe some form of the distinction between person and individual can be validly maintained based on the two different ways of differentiating the Father, Son, and Spirit that emerged during the debates over the filioque.
The Greeks read the Nicene Creed, with the Western addition of the Filioque clause sung three times.
Se abordo tambien la cuestion del Filioque, tema que suscito un animado debate.
Jared Lobdell claims that the chronological setting for Middle-earth expresses the filioque.
If I were missioned there, I would want to bring brains to an alogical world, to bring the doctrine of the Filioque to bear in a world which has been prone to Monophysitism, the world of Eastern Christianity, in which this world is condemned to futility, awaiting only to be subsumed by the Light that engulfs all single forms.
We also spent some days in Florence, the site of another significant council in the fifteenth century at which it seemed for a time that the separation between the Greek and Latin churches had been resolved, and resolved entirely on papal terms: recognition of papal primacy, acceptance of the filioque clause in the Creed, and the use of unleavened bread by the Greeks.
In an entry on the filioque, the great historian of doctrine Jaroslav Pelikan wrote,