filmgoing

film·go·er

 (fĭlm′gō′ər)
n.
One who goes to see movies; a moviegoer.

film′go′ing adj.

filmgoing

(ˈfɪlmˌɡəʊɪŋ)
n
(Film) esp Brit the activity of going to see films
References in periodicals archive ?
That uncertainty has been a common feature of the filmgoing experience this past spring, as movies produced in the wake of #MeToo and Time's Up have folded in -- with uneven success -- feminist critiques and expressions of "we get it" solidarity.
Looks like it's going to be a Hispanic Christmas, at least for filmgoing kiddies.
Yet there is also significance to why The Man from Snowy River should have been adapted in 1982, and for why it should have connected so clearly with the Australian filmgoing audience of the time.
He jokes, "As much as I remember 'Raiders of the Lost Ark' as an amazing filmgoing experience at 13, films like 'Assault on Precinct 13'or'Small Change' or 'After Hours' actually made me want to make films."
Chaplin composed the tune and later recorded it with the help of the Brunswick Co., which distributed the record (Brunswick 2912-B) through its "special publicity department." (26) Both the Brunswick record and Witmark sheet music were intended to exploit the song in tandem with the film's presentation, and therefore extend the filmgoing experience into the home--much like the theme songs of classic Hollywood films.
Flashbacking way back to Hollywood in the '20s and '30s, we learn that female stars topped the box office, since filmgoing in those early days was mainly a female activity.
India also figures at the top position for ticket sales as a vast and growing urban filmgoing public in India supports film culture and circulation (Wadia, 2008).
The two stars, who have a considerable fan base among the young filmgoing crowds in India, duly turned up to preen and pose next to a Deadpool poster that had hero Ryan Reynolds gunning to go in his wacky red- and- black superhero costume.
And on the topic of criticism, he has a few words for the British film industry: "The comic book franchise and popcorn movie have completely swallowed up the filmgoing experience.
The first work in the series (not in this show) took a grandiose, old-fashioned movie theater as its setting; projected on the screen is a scene of three waiters in an otherwise empty restaurant set out with white tablecloths, as if its clientele were about to turn up any minute--indeed, as if the filmgoing audience they are facing were the arriving guests.
Set in gritty Oxnard, Calif., the film boasts an almost entirely Latino cast of characters -- a welcome gesture toward a huge filmgoing demographic that rarely gets to see itself onscreen -- while smart casting and production design help capture the flavor of the environs with only moderate deployment of cultural stereotypes.