filter feeding


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filter feeding

n
(Zoology) zoology a method of feeding occurring in some aquatic animals, such as planktonic invertebrates and whalebone whales, in which minute food particles are filtered from the surrounding water
filter feeder n
Translations

filter feeding

n (Bio) → filtrazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
Release date- 26082019 - Modern flamingoes employ filter feeding and their feces are, as a result, rich in remains of microscopically-small aquatic prey.
These small animals burrow in the sand in the swash zone and use their antennae for filter feeding.
Caption: Above: Dr, Vince Lovko, Manager of Mote's Phytoplankton Ecology Program, points out one potential tool Mote scientists are testing: A structure with attached filter feeding organisms, whose ability to remove red tide from limited areas is being investigated.
First, most individuals exhibited sand surface filter feeding on the sand bottom, with sand taken into the mouth together with substrate particles and then expelled through the opercular opening.
"Until recently, it was thought that filter feeding first emerged when whales still had teeth.
The stamps are in four denominations and the first P5 denomination depicts both the Greater and Lesser Flamingo, the second P7 denomination illustrates Flamingos filter feeding, which is a common sight at the Makgadikgadi pan.
filter feeding populations "under even more strain," she added.
It is thought that in watercourses where this species was once abundant, their filter feeding clarified the water, benefiting other species in the rivers and streams.
If you envision the existence of freshwater mussels, filter feeding the Willamette's water for 50 years, would you wonder about your health and the consequences of filtering the river water to survive?
Instantaneous larval growth (per day) is expected to be fastest soon after first feeding, to decrease thereafter, and a large decrease or growth stanza is associated with an ontogenetic shift in feeding from selective particulate feeding to omnivorous filter feeding (Deegan, 1990; Lozano et al., 2012) in combination perhaps with transgressing the coastal boundary layer.
"They are pretty common around the British coast where there is fairly high constant water movement as they rely upon moving around constantly in the water for filter feeding."
Filter feeding entails the forward motion of an open-mouthed fish, such as a whale shark Rhincodon typus, through the water column from which planktonic prey are captured on highly modified gill structures and subsequently transported to the digestive system (Motta et al., 2010).