financier


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Related to financier: financer

fin·an·cier

 (fĭn′ən-sîr′, fə-năn′-, fī′nən-)
n.
One that engages in investing or raising large amounts of money.

[French, from Old French, from finance, payment; see finance.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

financier

(fɪˈnænsɪə; faɪ-)
n
(Banking & Finance) a person who is engaged or skilled in large-scale financial operations
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fin•an•cier

(ˌfɪn ənˈsɪər, ˌfaɪ nən-)

n.
1. a person skilled or engaged in managing large financial operations, whether public or corporate.
v.t.
2. to finance.
v.i.
3. to act as a financier.
[1610–20; < French; see finance, -ier2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.financier - a person skilled in large scale financial transactionsfinancier - a person skilled in large scale financial transactions
capitalist - a person who invests capital in a business (especially a large business)
banker - a financier who owns or is an executive in a bank
city man - a financier who works in one of the banks in the City of London
dealer, principal - the major party to a financial transaction at a stock exchange; buys and sells for his own account
Verb1.financier - conduct financial operations, often in an unethical manner
operate, run - direct or control; projects, businesses, etc.; "She is running a relief operation in the Sudan"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

financier

noun investor, banker, capitalist, tycoon, stockbroker, industrialist, speculator, magnate, captain of industry She was a slick, poised, City financier.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

financier

noun
One who is occupied with or expert in large-scale financial affairs:
Informal: moneyman.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُمَوِّل
finančník
finansierfinansmand
pénzember
fjármálamaîur
finančník
maliye uzmanımaliyeci

financier

[faɪˈnænsɪəʳ] Nfinanciero/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

financier

[fɪˈnænsiər faɪˈnænsiər] nfinancier m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

financier

nFinanzier m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

financier

[fɪˈnænsɪəʳ] nfinanziatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

finance

(faiˈnӕns) noun
1. (the study or management of) money affairs. He is an expert in finance.
2. (often in plural) the money one has to spend. The government is worried about the state of the country's finances.
verb
to give money for (a plan, business etc). Will the company finance your trip abroad?
fiˈnancial (-ʃəl) adjective
concerning money. financial affairs.
fiˈnancially adverb
fiˈnancier (-siə) , ((American) fainanˈsiər) noun
a person who manages large sums of money.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
He revolted at the bare idea of such a thing, and, besides, he hated the financier too cordially.
Well the greatest portion of the press were screeching in all possible tones, like a confounded company of parrots instructed by some devil with a taste for practical jokes, that the financier de Barral was helping the great moral evolution of our character towards the newly-discovered virtue of Thrift.
He was only twenty-six, but he was all man, a secret terror and delight to the financier, who alternated between pride in his son's aeroplane feats and fear for an untimely and terrible end.
With the handling of great sums of money and the acquisition of wealth had grown something of the financier's fever.
That venerable financier, however, still seemed struggling with portions of his well-lined attire, and at length produced from a very interior tail-coat pocket, a black oval case which he radiantly explained to be his Christmas present for his god-daughter.
Here is a distinguished statesman with presidential possibilities; I shall proceed to fall in love with him.' Or, `I shall set my heart upon this musician, whose fame is on every tongue?' Or, `This financier, who controls the world's money markets?'
And so, once more, John fell to work discounting the delightful future: his first appearance in the family pew; his first visit to his uncle Greig, who thought himself so great a financier, and on whose purblind Edinburgh eyes John was to let in the dazzling daylight of the West; and the details in general of that unrivalled transformation scene, in which he was to display to all Edinburgh a portly and successful gentleman in the shoes of the derided fugitive.
= various French noble families; a bouder = silent; Jacques Lafitte = French financier (1767-1844) who supported the 1830 July Revolution; Bourse = stock exchange}
The treaty of commerce has been concluded thanks to our coup-de-main which made us masters of the most skillful financier of England, for now I am at liberty to confess to you that the man we had to carry off was the treasurer of General Monk."
After the court attendant had uttered more unintelligible words, every one sat down; and the financier again moved hurriedly to the rail.
Mr Harrogate, the great financier, did indeed enter the room, but nobody looked at him.
SOME Financiers who were whetting their tongues on their teeth because the Government had "struck down" silver, and were about to "inaugurate" a season of sweatshed, were addressed as follows by a Member of their honourable and warlike body:

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