fingerhole


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fingerhole

(ˈfɪŋɡəˌhəʊl)
n
a hole through which a finger can be inserted
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The 13 chapters (plus bibliography and indices for instruments, makers, people and places, and general information) cover the following topics: Seaweed, Bark, Cane, and Gourd; Side-blown Horns; Shell Trumpets; Shorter End-blown Trumpets and Horns; Longer End-blown Trumpets; "Orchestral" Trumpets and Slide Trombones; "Orchestral" Natural Horns; Valved Horns, Trumpets, and Trombones; Bugles and Cornets [including flugelhorns, alto, tenor and baritone horns, euphoniums, tubas, saxhorns, etc.]; Fingerhole Horns [cornettos to ophicleides]; Accessories [mouthpieces, mutes, lyres, shanks, lubricants, cleaners, tools]; The Technology of Brass Instruments [the process of making instruments, including materials and shaping processes]; Playing [producing sounds, factors in tone, acoustics].
These latter are a curved horn with integral mouthpiece, three fingerholes and a thumbhole, captioned (and literally) krum horn, the rustic prototype of the curved, leather-covered wooden cornetts; a vessel block flute with the same fingerhole dispositions, made from chamois horn; and a very small block flute of bone with four fingerholes, captioned russpfeif.
This event was staged by Bob Barclay to draw attention to the fact that trumpets usually employed in professional recordings and performances are, in form and sound, quite unlike those in museums, yet this modern invention (the 'fingerhole' trumpet) is passed off as historical.
The audience also got a glimpse of some 'trumpeter's secrets', as they were treated to a rare comparison of the flute-like sound and inherently idiosyncratic tuning of a historical, natural trumpet played with the lips alone, juxtaposed with the fatter tone of the modern 'Baroque' trumpet, which has four fingerholes drilled in the tubing to correct the tuning.
With a little ingenuity, Fous found success in the game when he modified his glove, shoving four fingers into the two holes on the left side of the glove, thus leaving the fingerholes near the pocket empty to absorb the pounding of the ball.
The endere flutes, made from lengths of phragmites reed, were end-blown, with notches for embouchures and four fingerholes. There were six different sizes, the longest sounding an octave below the smallest.
He wanted to shove his fingers deep into the bloodred-rimmed fingerholes of his personalized bowling ball and roll a strike of such terrible force that nothing, nothing, was left standing after."
One of them blows what is probably a shawm, with a conical shape and visible fingerholes.
I am not entirely convinced by Izikowitz's classification system, where a wooden block (plug) and six or more fingerholes are interpreted as signs of European influence.
Can the sackbut player be expected to buy and learn a new instrument for music before c.1600, or is the sackbut in A destined to become another feature of historical brass playing, more mythical than factual, like the extreme side-embouchure, or the trumpet without fingerholes? It is may be fairer to draw a comparison with the Flemish transposing double-manual harpsichord: like that most historical but currently unused instrument, the A sackbut cannot justify its re-creation on the basis of a substantially different timbre, but does represent a significantly different outlook on an instrument that we do use.