fire screen


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fire screen

n.

fire screen

n
1. (Furniture) a decorative screen placed in the hearth when there is no fire
2. (Furniture) a screen placed before a fire to protect the face from intense heat

fire′ screen`


n.
a screen placed in front of a fireplace for protection.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fire screen - a metal screen before an open fire for protection (especially against flying sparks)
screen - a protective covering consisting of netting; can be mounted in a frame; "they put screens in the windows for protection against insects"; "a metal screen protected the observers"
References in periodicals archive ?
There are also family heirlooms including a wooden fire screen belonging to Nicky's great grandmother, which is more than 100 years old.
No detail was too small for this client, who worked with Kreissle Forge to design a fire screen of iron and glass in Art Deco geometric forms.
The frightened grandmother threw a fire screen at him, which he smashed.
Over six hours she bought 212 lots, including a pounds 40 stuffed owl, a pounds 1,400 copper fire screen and "enough furniture to fill a house".
Pole screens have been widely used since the 17th century; the fire screen could be found in most parlours of well-to-do homes.
They will now be resubmitted to ALS Chemex for additional Fire Screen testing to detect additional coarse gold findings.
A decorative metal fire screen and an all-in-one doormat, flower seat and umbrella stand are just two if the designs by city students set to be brought to life by a Shropshire giftware firm.
However she was unhappy with the Manning family's use of a large portrait of Edith Cavell as a fire screen, as she felt it was disrespectful to such a brave nurse who had given her life for the war effort.
Interspersed with the larger streamlined pieces is an eclectic assortment of smaller items, such as a nicked church pew in the bedroom, a freestanding mid-century modern fire screen and a couple of wooden end tables with sculptural elephant bases.
The production team are hoping to to make more exciting finds after their last visit in 2000 unearthed a fire screen by Birmingham-based Arts and Crafts artist Kate Eadie which was bought for pounds 5 and valued at pounds 2,000.
appeared in, The Fire Screen (1969), "has made me determined to