fire-and-brimstone


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fire-and-brimstone

adj
(of a sermon, preacher, etc) zealous, esp in threatening eternal damnation

fire′-and-brim′stone



adj.
threatening punishment in the hereafter.
fire′ and brim′stone, n.
[1795–1805]
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fire-and-brimstone

adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Clattenburg may have missed the Mousa Dembele eye-gouge on Diego Costa but, overall, his ability to keep 22 players on the pitch gave us a ferocious fire-and-brimstone epic, thoroughly enjoyed by all but the most squeamish.
FOOTLOOSE 8pm, E4 A rebellious, hip-swinging student from the city moves to a small religious community, where he instantly clashes with an old-school fire-and-brimstone preacher - who has banned dancing and rock 'n' roll because he considers them to be immoral.
If you're going to be saying we can have sectarian prayers because we shouldn't be censoring clerics, and then, in the same breath, say these clerics can't be over-the-top damning people to hell, and there can't be fire and brimstone in their prayers--well, if you happen to be a fire-and-brimstone cleric, that might be problematic for you.
AS his idiot father made him preach a fire-and-brimstone sermon to a gang of liberal New York hecklers, Samuel Boutwell, eight, burst into tears.
Seasoned viewers will guess who's going to be murdered and what the evangelist's shameful secret is, and the movie is anything but subtle: There's a liberal church versus fire-and-brimstone church montage that should be shown in film schools as a how-not-to.
They branded them 'Sodomites', which is a wonderful fire-and-brimstone word I haven't heard in years.
The Tsunami disaster that befell south Asia in late December did not go unexploited by the most extreme elements of the Fire-and-Brimstone crowd.
Satin Cast Out of Hell, 1981, epitomizes Finster's stock Baptist fire-and-brimstone message through a combination of textual pronouncements and a harrowing image of the underworld, while the self-portrait in This Howard in his Winter Cloths, 1985, is a powerful expression of his consciousness.
Edwards, a fire-and-brimstone Puritan preacher, was a major figure during the Great Awakening.
When John talks about Jesus as one who will "clear his threshing floor" and "gather the wheat into his granary; but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire," it sounds like the stuff of fire-and-brimstone preachers, something few Lutherans are known for.
I'm not advocating a wholesale return to fire-and-brimstone catechesis, but we have to strike a balance somewhere.