firepot


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firepot

(ˈfaɪəˌpɒt)
n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a small clay pot filled with combustible materials, formerly used as a missile
2. a container in which fire is held, either within a furnace or to carry the fire
3. a vessel used to hold substances which are to be treated at high temperatures, a crucible
4. (Cookery) a Chinese or Mongolian fondue-like cooking pot
5. (Cookery) a culinary dish made using such a pot
References in periodicals archive ?
From there, hot pot spread throughout East Asia, where it's known under many names and in many regional variations: firepot, steamboat, jim jum (Thailand), shabushabu (Japan), lau (Vietnam)--all delicious, and cooked not just for the Lunar New Year but for birthdays and other celebrations too.
One company that has brought together beer- and tea-inspired products, is Firepot Nomadic Teas, Nashville, Tennessee.
A Kashmiri woman warms herself with a kangri firepot on a houseboat in Srinagar yesterday.
The risk comes when the fuel is poured into an already burning firepot or onto a hot surface.
When Aristotle and Stephanos, the former encumbered with his firepot, take to the hills so as to outmanoeuvre possible pursuers, Aristotle describes them as 'Ridiculous.
Mongolian barbeque dishes, Mongolian firepot meals, Hakka and Chaozhou cooking, and sizzling tie ban entrees represented new choices.
They feature easy-to-adjust heat and draft settings, ash drop system, ash drawer and self-cleaning firepot.
Smoke rose once again as the witches blew out the firepot.
The cave was as if uninhabited, wilted were [Arjuna's] flower offerings, there was a firepot without fire.
All forges contain a firebrick or cast-iron firepot to hold the 2700 [degrees] F fire needed to forge-weld steel.
Kangri', a traditional firepot, which contains burning coals, is often used to keep hands and feet warm.
A firepot barrel whiskey had a smoky nose and hints of fruit and tobacco on the pallet.