firewood


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fire·wood

 (fīr′wo͝od′)
n.
Wood used as fuel.

firewood

(ˈfaɪəwʊd)
n
wood that is suitable for burning on a fire

fire•wood

(ˈfaɪərˌwʊd)

n.
wood suitable for fuel.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.firewood - wood used for fuelfirewood - wood used for fuel; "they collected and cut their own firewood"
fuel - a substance that can be consumed to produce energy; "more fuel is needed during the winter months"; "they developed alternative fuels for aircraft"
cordwood - firewood cut and stacked in cords; wood sold by the cord
backlog - the large log at the back of a hearth fire
firebrand, brand - a piece of wood that has been burned or is burning
pine knot - a joint of pine wood used for fuel
Translations
حَطَب
palivové dříví
brænde
tüzelőfatûzifatüzifa
eldiviîur
drevo na kúrenie
yakacak odun

firewood

[ˈfaɪəwʊd] Nleña f

firewood

[ˈfaɪərwʊd] nbois m de chauffage

firewood

[ˈfaɪəˌwʊd] nlegna da ardere

fire

(ˈfaiə) noun
1. anything that is burning, whether accidentally or not. a warm fire in the kitchen; Several houses were destroyed in a fire.
2. an apparatus for heating. a gas fire; an electric fire.
3. the heat and light produced by burning. Fire is one of man's greatest benefits.
4. enthusiasm. with fire in his heart.
5. attack by gunfire. The soldiers were under fire.
verb
1. (of china, pottery etc) to heat in an oven, or kiln, in order to harden and strengthen. The ceramic pots must be fired.
2. to make (someone) enthusiastic; to inspire. The story fired his imagination.
3. to operate (a gun etc) by discharging a bullet etc from it. He fired his revolver three times.
4. to send out or discharge (a bullet etc) from a gun etc. He fired three bullets at the target.
5. (often with at or on) to aim and operate a gun at; to shoot at. They suddenly fired on us; She fired at the target.
6. to send away someone from his/her job; to dismiss. He was fired from his last job for being late.
fire alarm
an apparatus (eg a bell) to give warning of a fire. Everyone had to leave the building when the fire alarm rang.
ˈfirearm noun
any type of gun. In most countries you need a licence to keep firearms.
ˈfire-brigade noun
a company of firemen. Call the fire-brigade!
ˈfire-cracker noun
a kind of firework which makes a loud noise.
ˈfire-engine noun
a vehicle carrying firemen and their equipment.
ˈfire-escape noun
a means of escape from a building in case of fire, usually in the form of a metal staircase on the outside of the building. Hotels should have fire-escapes.
ˈfire-extinguisher noun
an apparatus (usually containing chemicals) for putting out fires. There must be fire-extinguishers in every room.
ˈfire-guard noun
a metal framework placed in front of a fireplace for safety.
ˈfireman noun
a man whose job is to put out accidental fires or those caused deliberately as a criminal act.
ˈfireplace noun
a space in a room (usually in a wall) with a chimney above, for a fire. a wide stone fireplace.
ˈfireproof adjective
that is made so it cannot catch fire. a fireproof suit.
ˈfireside noun
a place beside a fireplace. The old man slept by the fireside; (also adjective) a fireside chair.
ˈfire-station noun
the building or buildings where fire-engines and other pieces of equipment used by firemen are kept.
ˈfirewood noun
wood that is suitable for burning as fuel. I went into the garden to cut firewood.
ˈfirework noun
a small exploding device giving off a colourful display of lights. Rockets are my favourite fireworks; (also adjective) a firework display; If your sister finds out, there'll be fireworks (= a display of anger)!
ˈfiring-squad noun
a group of soldiers with guns, to execute a prisoner. He must face the firing-squad.
catch fire
to begin to burn. Dry wood catches fire easily.
on fire
burning. The building is on fire!
open fire (usually with on)
to begin shooting at. The enemy opened fire (on us).
play with fire
to do something dangerous or risky. Putting all your money into that business is playing with fire!
set fire to (something) / set (something) on fire
to cause (something) to begin burning usually accidentally or deliberately as a criminal act. They set fire to the ambassador's house; She has set the house on fire.
under fire
1. being shot at. We have been under fire from the enemy all day.
2. being criticized or blamed. The government is under fire.
References in classic literature ?
Just a common block of firewood, one of those thick, solid logs that are put on the fire in winter to make cold rooms cozy and warm.
A good deal of firewood had been got in, but not enough for the captain's fancy, and he shook his head over it and told us we "must get back to this tomorrow rather livelier.
I crept back to the coal cellar, shut the door, and began to cover myself up as much as I could, and as noiselessly as possible in the darkness, among the firewood and coal therein.
All the trees of the wood were cut up into firewood and arranged in bundles ready for use.
The man who had left his saw sticking in the firewood he was cutting, set it in motion again; the women who had left on a door-step the little pot of hot ashes, at which she had been trying to soften the pain in her own starved fingers and toes, or in those of her child, returned to it; men with bare arms, matted locks, and cadaverous faces, who had emerged into the winter light from cellars, moved away, to descend again; and a gloom gathered on the scene that appeared more natural to it than sunshine.
In the inhabited parts we bought a little firewood, hired pasture for the animals, and bivouacked in the corner of the same field with them.
When it branches out in different directions, it shows that parties have been sent to collect firewood.
A little way past the inn we came upon a notice-board whereon the lord of the manor warned all wayfarers against trespassing on the common by making encampments, lighting fires or cutting firewood thereon, and to this fortunate circumstance I owe the most interesting story my companion had to tell.
Presently, a peasant will pass the window in his cart bound for the forest to cut firewood, and the whole party will feel merry and contented together.
The soldiers tore down the Old North Church, and used its rotten boards and timbers for firewood.
Halfway lay some snow-covered piles of firewood and across and along them a network of shadows from the bare old lime trees fell on the snow and on the path.
When she found that her husband had used her clothesline, and the logs she had wanted for firewood, and the boards she had intended to mend the shed with, and a lot of gold nails, she became very angry.