fir

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fir

a coniferous tree belonging to the pine family, characterized by its pyramidal style of growth, flat needles, and erect cones
Not to be confused with:
fur – the fine, soft, thick, hairy coat of the skin of a mammal
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

FIR

abbr.
far-infrared radiation

fir

 (fûr)
n.
1.
a. Any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies, having linear flattened needles and erect cones with deciduous scales.
b. Any of several similar or related trees, such as the Douglas fir.
2. The wood of any these trees.

[Middle English firre, probably of Scandinavian origin; see perkwu- in Indo-European roots.]

fir′ry adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fir

(fɜː)
n
1. (Plants) any pyramidal coniferous tree of the N temperate genus Abies, having single needle-like leaves and erect cones: family Pinaceae. See also red fir, silver fir, balsam fir
2. (Plants) any of various other trees of the family Pinaceae, such as the Douglas fir
3. (Plants) the wood of any of these trees
[Old English furh; related to Old Norse fura, Old High German foraha fir, Latin quercus oak]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fir

(fɜr)

n.
1. any evergreen tree of the genus Abies, of the pine family, having flat needles and erect cones.
2. the wood of such a tree.
[1250–1300; Middle English firre, Old English fyrh]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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fir
Douglas firs can attain heights of more than 200 feet (61 meters).

fir

(fûr)
Any of various evergreen trees that have flat needles and bear cones. Firs generally grow in northern regions or at higher altitudes.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
pine, fir, spruce - Pine, fir, and spruce are quite different from each other, though they are all conifers; pine has clusters of long, needle-shaped leaves, spruce is a type of fir, and the only scientific difference between the two is that spruces have rectangular needles while firs have flat, needle-shaped leaves.
See also related terms for pine.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fir - nonresinous wood of a fir treefir - nonresinous wood of a fir tree  
fir tree, true fir, fir - any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies; chiefly of upland areas
douglas fir - strong durable timber of a douglas fir
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.fir - any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abiesfir - any of various evergreen trees of the genus Abies; chiefly of upland areas
Abies, genus Abies - true firs
fir - nonresinous wood of a fir tree
silver fir - any of various true firs having leaves white or silvery white beneath
Abies bracteata, Abies venusta, bristlecone fir, Santa Lucia fir - a pyramidal fir of southwestern California having spiny pointed leaves and cone scales with long spines
fir cone - the seed-producing cone of a fir tree
conifer, coniferous tree - any gymnospermous tree or shrub bearing cones
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
تَنّوب، شَجَرَة الميلاد
jedle
grangrantræ
abio
nulg
pihta
jela
erdeifenyõfenyő
òinur
eglė
egle
brad
jedľa
jelka

fir

[fɜːʳ]
A. N (also fir tree) → abeto m
B. CPD fir cone Npiña f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fir

[ˈfɜːr] fir tree nsapin m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fir

nTanne f; (= wood)Tanne (→ nholz nt) f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fir

[fɜːʳ] n (also fir tree) → abete m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

fir

(fəː) noun
a kind of evergreen tree that bears cones (ˈfir-cones) and is often grown for its wood.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Gilbert lifted Anne from the buggy and led her into the garden, through the little gate between the ruddy-tipped firs, up the trim, red path to the sandstone step.
Only the dead-looking evergreen firs dotted about in the forest, and this oak, refused to yield to the charm of spring or notice either the spring or the sunshine.
With an instinct as to possibilities he did not now, as he had intended, make for the first station beyond the town, but plunged still farther under the firs, which here abounded for miles.
That bridge led Anne's dancing feet up over a wooded hill beyond, where perpetual twilight reigned under the straight, thick-growing firs and spruces; the only flowers there were myriads of delicate "June bells," those shyest and sweetest of woodland blooms, and a few pale, aerial starflowers, like the spirits of last year's blossoms.
The emphasis was helped by the speaker's hair, which bristled on the skirts of his bald head, a plantation of firs to keep the wind from its shining surface, all covered with knobs, like the crust of a plum pie, as if the head had scarcely warehouse-room for the hard facts stored inside.
Near the top of this hill, about two miles from Linden-Car, stood Wildfell Hall, a superannuated mansion of the Elizabethan era, built of dark grey stone, venerable and picturesque to look at, but doubtless, cold and gloomy enough to inhabit, with its thick stone mullions and little latticed panes, its time-eaten air-holes, and its too lonely, too unsheltered situation, - only shielded from the war of wind and weather by a group of Scotch firs, themselves half blighted with storms, and looking as stern and gloomy as the Hall itself.
Arthur's shadow flitted rather faster among the sturdy oaks of the Chase than might have been expected from the shadow of a tired man on a warm afternoon, and it was still scarcely four o'clock when he stood before the tall narrow gate leading into the delicious labyrinthine wood which skirted one side of the Chase, and which was called Fir-tree Grove, not because the firs were many, but because they were few.
The pleasure of having Lucy to look at, and the prospect of the afternoon visit to Garum Firs, where she would hear uncle Pullet's musical box, had been marred as early as eleven o'clock by the advent of the hair-dresser from St.
What a nice little fir!" But this was what the Tree could not bear to hear.
Here they advanced as noiselessly as possible, lest keepers or other enemies should be about, and stopped at the foot of a tall fir, at the top of which Martin pointed out with pride the kestrel's nest, the object of their quest.
They lived with their Mother in a sand-bank, underneath the root of a very big fir tree.
In Staffordshire, on the estate of a relation where I had ample means of investigation, there was a large and extremely barren heath, which had never been touched by the hand of man; but several hundred acres of exactly the same nature had been enclosed twenty-five years previously and planted with Scotch fir. The change in the native vegetation of the planted part of the heath was most remarkable, more than is generally seen in passing from one quite different soil to another: not only the proportional numbers of the heath-plants were wholly changed, but twelve species of plants (not counting grasses and carices) flourished in the plantations, which could not be found on the heath.