first of all


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Adv.1.first of all - before anything else; "first we must consider the garter snake"
Translations
أولا، بدايَةً
především
for det førsteførst og fremmest
d’abordtout d’abordtout d'abord
í fyrsta lagi

first

(fəːst) adjective, adverb
before all others in place, time or rank. the first person to arrive; The boy spoke first.
adverb
before doing anything else. `Shall we eat now?' `Wash your hands first!
noun
the person, animal etc that does something before any other person, animal etc. the first to arrive.
ˈfirstly adverb
in the first place. I have three reasons for not going – firstly, it's cold, secondly, I'm tired, and thirdly, I don't want to!
first aid adjective (etc) treatment of a wounded or sick person before the doctor's arrival: We should all learn first aid; ()
first-aid treatment.
ˈfirst-born adjective, noun
(one's) oldest (child).
ˌfirst-ˈclass adjective
1. of the best quality. a first-class hotel.
2. very good. This food is first-class!
3. (for) travelling in the best and most expensive part of the train, plane, ship etc. a first-class passenger ticket; (also adverb) She always travels first-class.
ˌfirst-ˈhand adjective, adverb
(of a story, description etc) obtained directly, not through various other people. a first-hand account; I heard the story first-hand.
ˌfirst-ˈrate adjective
of the best quality. She is a first-rate architect.
at first
at the beginning. At first I didn't like him.
at first hand
obtained etc directly. I was able to acquire information at first hand.
first and foremost
first of all.
first of all
to begin with; the most important thing is. First of all, let's clear up the mess; First of all, the scheme is impossible – secondly, we can't afford it.
References in classic literature ?
Let us then consider, first of all, what will be their way of life, now that we have thus established them.
We must, therefore, first of all become aware that not only has nothing been done in the direction of a political Europe, but even less than nothing, since the European Union today weighs less in the world politically than the main European nations taken together weighed thirty years ago.
First of all, the ubiquity of bibliographic instruction has meant that many younger teaching faculty have some familiarity with it, perhaps when they were students.