firstness


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firstness

(ˈfɜːstnəs)
n
the condition or quality of being first
References in periodicals archive ?
Since Peirce thought that these three categories were (1) discernible in all phenomena and (2) really defined reality, he would surely reject Corrington's limitation of firstness to nature naturing.
In sections on the semioticization of philosophy, historical connections, and Peirce challenged, they discuss such topics as the interconnection between his pragmatism and semiotics, the presence of Peirce's category of firstness in Schilling and Schopenhauer, the Charybdis of semiotics and Scylla of rhetoric: Peirce and Gorgias of Leontini on the rhetoric of being, hopes of Derrida's reading: the emergence of Peirce's texts in the poststructuralist context, and Peirce and the theory of disembodiment.
Haecceity corresponds to Peirce's state of secondness which includes also firstness (Peirce (1931-1958, vol.
In the broad project of semiotics, the cenopythagorean categories' issue--namely Firstness, Secondness and Thirdness--is the beginning of theorizing about the sign, but also attempt made by Peirce to discuss the tradition posited by Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and Immanuel Kant, but mainly by Edmund Husserl's phenomenology.
See Akhil Reed Amar, The First Amendment's Firstness, 47 U.
Also, these three termini can be defined in terms of firstness, secondness or thirdness or being denominated as a Representamen, Object or Interpretant respectively.
Eventually, online readers took the concept of firstness into their own hands and shattered it over their knees.
Mir Valiuddin maintains that when, The Sufi who is conversant with the Knowledge of Nearness knows the secret of the relation between Haqq and Khalq, God and the phenomenal things, the secret of nearness and proximity, immanence and transcendence, Firstness and Lastness, Outwardness and Inwardness of God with the phenomenal things.
The movement of feeling to habit for Peirce relates to his metaphysical categories of Firstness, Secondness and Thirdness as discussed in Peirce, C.
These three elements of the world represent Peirce's three categories, where firstness is what he names as the doctrine of tychism in his later essay The Law of Mind, secondness, his version of mechanical laws, and thirdness the world's tendency of habit taking or Peirce's teleology, which is systematized in Evolutionary Love.
The Romantic ideal of firstness was of little interest to the Renaissance, which valued the virtues of innovation and invention more as rediscovery than as creation from a void (Greene 27-53; Castor 103-13).
Theologically, Peirce's fundamental triadic categories of Firstness (possibility), Secondness (actuality), and Thirdness (mediation) are suggested as providing a semiotic model for the classical Christian understanding of the Trinitarian perichoresis.