fishwife

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Related to fishwives: fishwife, Supernature

fish·wife

 (fĭsh′wīf′)
n. pl. fish·wives (-wīvz′)
1. A woman who sells fish.
2. A woman regarded as coarse and shrewishly abusive.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fishwife

(ˈfɪʃˌwaɪf)
n, pl -wives
1. (Commerce) a woman who sells fish
2. a coarse scolding woman
ˈfishˌwifely adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fish•wife

(ˈfɪʃˌwaɪf)

n., pl. -wives.
1. a woman who sells fish.
2. a coarse-mannered, raucous woman.
[1375–1425]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fishwife - someone who sells fishfishwife - someone who sells fish    
bargainer, dealer, monger, trader - someone who purchases and maintains an inventory of goods to be sold
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

fishwife

noun
A person, traditionally a woman, who persistently nags or criticizes:
Informal: battle-ax.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

fishwife

[ˈfɪʃwaɪf] N (fishwives (pl)) [ˈfɪʃwaɪvz]pescadera f (pej) → verdulera f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fishwife

[ˈfɪʃwaɪf] n
to scream like a fishwife (loudly and angrily) (mainly British)crier comme une poissonnière
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fishwife

[ˈfɪʃˌwaɪf] n (pej) → pescivendola
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Some officers of the scattered infantry were cursing and railing like fishwives. Their scold- ing voices could be heard above the din.
She was quite innocent, but it had to be done, for the satisfaction of the fishwives of Paris.
Gaynor Allen, the chair and a cox of the club, says: "The fishwives were a massive part of the town and as a boating club we are quite mindful of keeping those traditions going.
"Taxi drivers are fishwives, so they have all the gossip before anyone else.
Two are crew members of the reality TV show, Fishwives. Cutter's job is to find the bodies, examine the crew's footage for clues, and track down the men who killed them.
He depicted fishwives many times, hard at work and poignantly waiting for their men to return from sea.
The local golf club put up a prize of a creel (fishing basket) to be contested by the fishwives of the area.
As a work of scholarship on the eighteenth century, it is a masterful and often enlightening work, offering new interpretations of well-known works by authors such as Defoe, Johnson, and Swift, and engaging with previously understudied voices such as those of the Billingsgate fishwives and John "Orator" Henley.
So I went to visit fishing harbours and museums in places like Anstruther and Musselburgh, where I met people whose grandparents had been fishermen and fishwives.
In the Victorian era, we were fishwives and we're wearing corsets and these voluminous skirts, in the mud.
In a collaborative essay, fishwives from London and Amsterdam are compared.
The display also includes Dobson's watercolour of Newcastle fishwives in action in the Guildhall Fishmarket as well as a series of impressive watercolours by the two artists showing the proposed designs for Central Station, which was opened in 1850.