fission reactor


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fission reactor

n
(General Physics) a nuclear reactor in which a fission reaction takes place
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These are nuclear energy generators that are much safer, cleaner and more efficient than their fission reactor cousins that we currently use for energy today.
Currently, Holman is working at the Intellectual Ventures Laboratory, where a wide variety of futuristic invention projects are underway, including a fission reactor powered by nuclear waste, a machine to suppress hurricanes, a system to reverse global warming, and a device that can shoot mosquitoes out of the sky with lasers to help eradicate malaria.
NASA has successfully demonstrated the working of its Kilopower Nuclear Fission Reactor - a system designed to power bases on moon, Mars, and beyond and make deep-space exploration a reality.
The Kilopower fission reactor will generate 10 kilowatts of electricity for a minimum of 10 years--more than enough to run several average American househoulds.
SMRs are a type of nuclear fission reactor which are smaller than conventional reactors that are manufactured in a factory before being brought to a site where the plant will be fully constructed.
For the next decade, the physicist researched fission reactor design, using the Oak Ridge model as his starting point.
The UNIT propulsion system consists of two chambers which act as a fusion reactor (main chamber) for neutronic fusion and a fission reactor (sub-chamber) for binary fission, respectively.
The team said the proposed hybrid reactor could generate three times the power of a current fission reactor, while being safer as both fusion and fission reactions could be stopped immediately by cutting off external power, so disasters are less likely.
Considering the cores of the two systems was and is a reasonable basis for comparison, since the nuclear core is the heat source for a fission reactor power plant, and ITER is the prototype of the heat source for a tokamak power plant.
It has been known since the 1970s that a successful tokamak machine would be so large and complex that the cost of its electrical output would be an order of magnitude more expensive than the power from the most expensive fission reactor. Moreover, fusion plants would produce radioactive waste.