fixt

fixt

(fɪkst)
adj
an archaic or literary spelling of fixed
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References in classic literature ?
yet not for those Nor what the Potent Victor in his rage Can else inflict do I repent or change, Though chang'd in outward lustre; that fixt mind And high disdain, from sence of injur'd merit, That with the mightiest rais'd me to contend, And to the fierce contention brought along Innumerable force of Spirits arm'd That durst dislike his reign, and me preferring, His utmost power with adverse power oppos'd In dubious Battel on the Plains of Heav'n, And shook his throne.
Th' ascending pile Stood fixt her stately highth, and strait the dores Op'ning thir brazen foulds discover wide Within, her ample spaces, o're the smooth And level pavement: from the arched roof Pendant by suttle Magic many a row Of Starry Lamps and blazing Cressets fed With Naphtha and ASPHALTUS yeilded light As from a sky.
“Sure I know’d ye’d be wanting that same,” said the landlady; “it’s fixt and ready to the boiling.
Saints are 12th in t table but just three pabove the drop zone five games without a Among festive fixt are trips to Spurs a Manchester United.
fixt tra Ze A statement from Northampton read "George North suffered a sprain to his posterior cruciate ligament against Saracens N G fere post ment Continued on Page 35 North in form
Uriel's exceptional perspicuity, caught 'fixt in cogitation deep' (629), reveals him at this moment to be blinder than the reader, who foreknowing can easily see the artificiality of the disguise [Satan dressed for a masque] and the fraudulence it conceals" (45).
Even after upon his showing Womanhood his qualifying shield she allows him to continue, Scudamour relates: "euermore vpon the Goddesse [Venus's] face / Mine eye was fixt, for feare of her offence" (56.1-2).
FIXT IXT IX UREUR S: Ire (h), Eng (a), Sco(a), Fra (h), Wal (h).
If they be two, they are two so As stifle twin compasses are two, Thy soule the fixt foot, makes no show To move, but doth, if the'other doe.
if the and t the fixt intriguing '96 final They have a huge Old Trafford crowd to keep happy and beating the old rivals would really do David Moyes a world of good.
"We have held several treaties with the Americans," Chief Tassel of the Cherokees lamented, "when Bounds was always fixt and fair promises always made that the white people Should not come over, but we always find that after a treaty they Settle much faster than before." (184) Earlier, "when we treated with Congress we made no doubt but we should have Justice"; now the Cherokees began to credit rumors "that the Americans only ment to deceive us" and buy time "till all our lands is Settled." (185) These suspicions of congressional duplicity rapidly became "universal through the Indians." (186)