flag of convenience


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flag of convenience

n. pl. flags of convenience
A foreign flag under which a merchant vessel is registered for purposes of reducing operating costs or avoiding government regulations.

flag of convenience

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a national flag flown by a ship registered in that country to gain financial or legal advantage
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The benefits provided by flag of convenience countries are far more than those provided by Pakistan.
East Belfast UVF is nothing more than a drugs gang who operate under a flag of convenience in an attempt to legitimise their existence.
International Transport Workers Federation Australia national coordinator Dean Summers told the Daily Mercury in Mackay that one of the worst features of the Panamanian flag of convenience is there will be no real inquiry into this man's death.
ISIS can out-fight the Taliban because it has more money, and 36 years of endemic warfare in the region implies that many who enlist are essentially mercenaries who have no other trade and ISIS offers a well-remunerated flag of convenience.
Having partnered with a "classical, recognised underwriter" on the London insurance market, Libyan Wings should have little difficulty security its own 'flag of convenience' for European connections.
the ITF campaign against flag of convenience states.
Meanwhile, Gareth Clubb, director of Friends of the Earth Cymru, said: "We know that the conditions off the North Wales coast are very bad at the moment, but it's difficult to come to the conclusion that this vessel's registration in Antigua (known as a 'flag of convenience') has had no bearing on the ship's difficulties.
Market denial and international fisheries regulation; the targeted and elective use of trade measures against the flag of convenience fishing industry.
Now Clr Terry Lyons - who was elected to the council as an independent - accused the former Conservative of using the label as "a flag of convenience".
He was also the man who stood up in the Alex Young Lounge during an AGM and spoke of his lifelong love of Everton, but stood like a rabbit transfixed by headlights when a shrewd inquistor asked: "Who scored the winning goal in the '66 FA Cup final?" "Errr, I was a student in Munich in 66," was his entirely unconvincing answer, exposing Samuelson as the financial world's equivalent of Robbie Keane, a man who seems to fly a flag of convenience whenever it suits.
Countries offering a flag of convenience can be compared to tax havens (they are generally the same), he added, in contrast with "simple" primary infringements (eg quota overruns).