flame war


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flame war

An online discussion on a newsgroup, forum, or thread of blog comments in which debate about a subject degenerates into an exchange of personal insults.
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There was a temptation, after the sides had settled into an uneasy ceasefire, to dismiss this weird internet flame war as a bunch of digital noise.
But instead of feeding the fire in a Twitter flame war that would serve only to distract from more important issues of the day, Fallon instead opted to keep the focus right where it belonged: on the United States border.
In some instances, the politics appears to be naive, as when he characterises Lenin as 'a master troll, king of the flame war.' The chapter on Cuba is rather cursory and I wish there were more of Africa, but we have to be grateful to Kalder for saving us from joining 'hundreds of millions of people compelled to read very bad books.'
"I'm not going to point fingers, I'm not going to take sides, I'm not going to engage in a flame war on social media.
You need not crap on anyone, start a so-called flame war for lack of anything better to do, or do other silly things with your keyboard.
Jun 22-CANCER Jul 22 THIS week you'll get involved in a bitter flame war with a Twitter troll, even though you're 73 and have no idea what any of those things are.
His Twitter feed is like a piece of cultural and political performance art, a running flame war not just with his fellow candidates but with the likes of Cher and Bette Midler.
Flame war! No subject was too benign to generate outrage and spark a lively exchange.
That said, avoid the urge to argue with a customer who is combative or flinging insults just to start or fuel a flame war. Keep in mind that your audience is watching, so resist the temptation to sink to their level.
This article asks whether the flame war and other communications over a reference to child abuse in a fan fiction competition could be regarded as feminist-influenced deliberation and consciousness-raising over the issue.
In reproduced manuscript pages showing Fingal's notations in red--and through a back-and-forth between the two that reads more like an Internet flame war than professional correspondence (or is that just a feature of the book's "meta" aspect?)--The Lifespan of a Fact illustrates the vast, often ignored chasm between "accuracy" and "truth" in writing.