chromosphere

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chro·mo·sphere

 (krō′mə-sfîr′)
n.
1. An incandescent, transparent layer of gas, primarily hydrogen, several thousand miles in depth, lying above and surrounding the photosphere of a star, such as the sun, but distinctly separate from the corona.
2. A gaseous layer similar to a chromosphere around a star.

chro′mo·spher′ic (-sfîr′ĭk, -sfĕr′-) adj.

chromosphere

(ˈkrəʊməˌsfɪə)
n
(Astronomy) a gaseous layer of the sun's atmosphere extending from the photosphere to the corona and visible during a total eclipse of the sun
chromospheric adj

chro•mo•sphere

(ˈkroʊ məˌsfɪər)

n.
1. a gaseous envelope surrounding the sun from which hydrogen and other gases erupt.
2. a gaseous envelope surrounding a star.
[1865–70]
chro`mo•spher′ic (-ˈsfɛr ɪk, -ˈsfɪər-) adj.

chro·mo·sphere

(krō′mə-sfîr′)
A glowing, transparent layer of gas surrounding the photosphere of a star, especially the sun. The sun's chromosphere is several thousand miles thick and is composed mainly of hydrogen.

chromosphere

A layer of gas that lies above the photosphere of a star, such as the Sun.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chromosphere - a gaseous layer of the sun's atmosphere (extending from the photosphere to the corona) that is visible during a total eclipse of the sun
layer - a relatively thin sheetlike expanse or region lying over or under another
Sun - the star that is the source of light and heat for the planets in the solar system; "the sun contains 99.85% of the mass in the solar system"; "the Earth revolves around the Sun"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
"The coming of the sudden shadow," the approach of the umbra, shadow bands, Baily's Beads, the chromo-sphere and flash spectrum, totality, the corona, "the eye of God," coronal loops and streamers, darkness at midday, the "360[degrees] sunset," the (ruby-red) solar prominences, the eclipse wind (and temperature drop), planets and stars visible in a midday sky of midnight blue--and what I take to be the most staggering sight in all of astronomy: the diamond ring.
During a solar eclipse, the flash spectrum associated with the chromosphere of the Sun becomes readily visible [2-5].
Since then, great attention has been given to identifying the lines which are contained within the flash spectrum of the chromosphere, particularly through the efforts of astronomers like John Evershed [9,10] and Donald Menzel [11,12].