flat-footed

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flat-foot·ed

(flăt′fo͝ot′ĭd)
adj.
1. Of or afflicted with flatfoot.
2.
a. Steady on the feet.
b. Informal Without reservation; forthright: a flat-footed refusal.
3. Unable to react quickly; unprepared: The new product caught their competitors flat-footed.

flat′-foot′ed·ly adv.
flat′-foot′ed·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flat-footed

(ˌflætˈfʊtɪd)
adj
1. (Medicine) having flatfoot
2. informal
a. clumsy or awkward
b. downright and uncompromising
3. informal off guard or unawares (often in the phrase catch flat-footed)
ˌflat-ˈfootedly adv
ˌflat-ˈfootedness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.flat-footed - with feet flat on the ground; not tiptoe
footed - having feet; "footed creatures"; "a footed sofa"
2.flat-footed - unprepared and unable to react quickly; "the new product caught their competitors flat-footed"
unready - not prepared or in a state of readiness; slow to understand or respond; "she cursed her unready tongue"
3.flat-footed - having broad flat feet that usually turn outward; "a slow flat-footed walk"
splayfoot, splayfooted - having feet that turn outward
4.flat-footed - without reservation; "a flat-footed refusal"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
direct - straightforward in means or manner or behavior or language or action; "a direct question"; "a direct response"; "a direct approach"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

flat-footed

[ˈflætˈfʊtɪd] ADJ
1.de pies planos
to be flat-footedtener los pies planos
2. (fig) (= clumsy) → patoso (Sp)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

flat-footed

[ˈflætˈfʊtɪd] adj to be flat-footedavere i piedi piatti
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Felipe Anderson who scored twice in the Irons' reverse fixture win, looks the most likely benificiary again of any Clarets flat-footedness.
and a Russian lawyer who claimed to have incriminating material about Hillary Clinton adds to the impression of flat-footedness. The Washington Post counted eight instances in which members of the Trump administration previously denied any such meeting took place.
I have been critical of the Crown Prosecution Service in the past, especially its flat-footedness in dealing with phone hacking.
In many ways, the flat-footedness of the regime in public relations terms was quite extraordinary.
The Bulgarian's outstanding athleticism and instinctive court-craft were in stark contrast to Murray's uncustomary flat-footedness and inconsistent ground-strokes.
"Stylish sneakers, loafers, heelless moccasins are also dangerous for health," resulting in flat-footedness, deformation of muscles of calf, varicosity, as well as venous insufficiency, he explained.