flatfish

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flat·fish

 (flăt′fĭsh′)
n. pl. flatfish or flat·fish·es
Any of numerous chiefly marine fishes of the order Pleuronectiformes, including the flounders, soles, and halibuts, having a laterally compressed body with both eyes on the upper side.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flatfish

(ˈflætˌfɪʃ)
n, pl -fish or -fishes
(Animals) any marine spiny-finned fish of the order Heterosomata, including the halibut, plaice, turbot, and sole, all of which (when adult) swim along the sea floor on one side of the body, which is highly compressed and has both eyes on the uppermost side
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

flat•fish

(ˈflætˌfɪʃ)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -fish, (esp. for kinds or species) -fish•es.
any of various bottom-dwelling fishes of the order Pleuronectiformes that have a flattened, laterally oriented body with both eyes on the upper side.
[1700–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

flat·fish

(flăt′fĭsh′)
Any of numerous bottom-dwelling fish, such as the flounder, halibut, and sole, that have a flattened body. During a flatfish's larval stage, the head twists and one eye migrates to the other side, so that both eyes in the adult are on one side of the body.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flatfish - sweet lean whitish flesh of any of numerous thin-bodied fishflatfish - sweet lean whitish flesh of any of numerous thin-bodied fish; usually served as thin fillets
saltwater fish - flesh of fish from the sea used as food
flounder - flesh of any of various American and European flatfish
fillet of sole, sole - lean flesh of any of several flatfish
halibut - lean flesh of very large flatfish of Atlantic or Pacific
2.flatfish - any of several families of fishes having flattened bodies that swim along the sea floor on one side of the body with both eyes on the upper side
acanthopterygian, spiny-finned fish - a teleost fish with fins that are supported by sharp inflexible rays
Heterosomata, order Heterosomata, order Pleuronectiformes - flatfishes: halibut; sole; flounder; plaice; turbot; tonguefishes
flounder - any of various European and non-European marine flatfish
righteye flounder, righteyed flounder - flounders with both eyes on the right side of the head
holibut, halibut - marine food fish of the northern Atlantic or northern Pacific; the largest flatfish and one of the largest teleost fishes
lefteye flounder, lefteyed flounder - flatfishes with both eyes on the left side of the head
tonguefish, tongue-fish - left-eyed marine flatfish whose tail tapers to a point; of little commercial value
sole - right-eyed flatfish; many are valued as food; most common in warm seas especially European
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Plattfisch
poisson plat
lepényhal
カレイ

flatfish

[ˈflætfɪʃ] N (flatfish or flatfishes (pl)) → pez m plano (Tech) → (pez m) pleuronectiforme m (p.ej. platija, lenguado)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

flatfish

[ˈflætfɪʃ] npoisson m platflat-footed [ˌflætˈfʊtɪd] adj
to be flat-footed → avoir les pieds plats
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

flatfish

[ˈflætfɪʃ] npesce m piatto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The goal of this study was to assess the escape of flatfishes as a function of dredge pause duration and to estimate collateral loss of scallops through a series of test dredges.
The total number of bushels of scallops and the number of flatfishes were recorded for each dredge tow.
Quantitative RT-PCR showed that pitx2 was a crucial gene in Nodal signaling pathway that might regulate the migration of eyes in flatfishes.
Because the morphological features of flatfishes make it difficult for them to turn left or right (Stickney et al., 1973), most yellowtail would be expected to swim in the direction they are facing; therefore, fish oriented inward, if they swam on their current trajectory, would observe the trawl gear earlier in their field of view and hit the footgear, increasing their probability of being captured.
During 5 tows, more than 12 h of video footage of flatfishes were collected at depths of 70-82 m, at bottom temperatures ranging from 0.6[degrees]C to 1.2[degrees]C.
During metamorphosis, flatfishes undergo a 90 tilt to the right or left side to become bottom-adapted animals; however, the otolith organs do not rotate with the skull as the eyes did [7,31,32].
[8.] Lychakov DV, Rebane YT, Lombarte A, Demestre M, Fuiman LA (2008) Saccular otolith mass asymmetry in adult flatfishes. J Fish Biol 72: 2579-2594.
This lesson on flatfishes addresses Principle 5 of Ocean Literacy (The ocean supports a great diversity of life and ecosystems), Concept j: Coastal estuaries (where rivers meet the ocean) provide important and productive nursery areas for many marine species.
Many flatfishes use temperate and tropical coastal areas such as bays, lagoons, and estuaries (1).
However, the general body morphology as an adult (i.e., small mouth with teeth only on blind side, sharp ridge between the eyes) is quite similar to that of pleuronectid flatfishes of the genus Pleuronichthys, (Allen 1982).