flatfoot

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Related to flatfooting: buck dance

flat·foot

 (flăt′fo͝ot′)
n.
1. pl. flat·feet (-fēt′) A condition in which the arch of the foot is abnormally flattened down so that the entire sole makes contact with the ground.
2. pl. flat·foots
a. Informal A person with flat feet.
b. Slang A police officer.
intr.v. flat·foot·ed, flat·foot·ing, flat·foots
To walk in a flat-footed manner: "He flatfooted along, twirling his club" (James T. Farrell).

flatfoot

(ˈflætˌfʊt)
npl -foots or -feet
1. (Pathology) Also called: splayfoot a condition in which the entire sole of the foot is able to touch the ground because of flattening of the instep arch
2. (Law) a slang word (usually derogatory) for a policeman

flat•foot

(ˈflætˌfʊt or, for 1, -ˈfʊt)

n., pl. -feet for 1, -foots for 2,3.
1.
a. a condition in which the arch of the foot is flattened so that the entire sole rests upon the ground.
b. Also, flat′ foot′. a foot with such an arch.
2. Slang. a police officer; cop.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flatfoot - a policeman who patrols a given regionflatfoot - a policeman who patrols a given region
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
2.flatfoot - a foot afflicted with a fallen archflatfoot - a foot afflicted with a fallen arch; abnormally flattened and spread out
foot, human foot, pes - the part of the leg of a human being below the ankle joint; "his bare feet projected from his trousers"; "armored from head to foot"

flatfoot

noun
Slang. A member of a law-enforcement agency:
Informal: cop, law.
Slang: bull, copper, fuzz, gendarme, heat, man (often uppercase).
Chiefly British: bobby, constable, peeler.
Translations

flat·foot

, flat-foot
n. pie plano.
References in periodicals archive ?
The style, in which the feet stay close to the floor with a consistent downbeat, has several names including flatfooting and buckdancing, and it's typically done without a partner.
Multi-instrumentalists and singers Ian and Sue Hartland are no strangers to up-tempo American folk music and are also Britain's leading exponents in the traditional flatfooting style of dancing.
Coventry were level within four minutes, Dorrian flatfooting the defence as he cut through from 35 metres for a superb individual try between the posts with Ronnie McLean converting.