flatlander


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flat·land

 (flăt′lănd′, -lənd)
n.
1. Land that varies little in elevation.
2. flatlands A geographic area composed chiefly of land that varies little in elevation.

flat′land′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flatlander

(ˈflætˌlændə)
n
censorious US a term used in various hilly or mountainous regions of North America, particularly Vermont, to denote an outsider, someone who doesn't belong
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
The first objection is, that a Flatlander, seeing a Line, sees something that must be THICK to the eye as well as LONG to the eye (otherwise it would not be visible, if it had not some thickness); and consequently he ought (it is argued) to acknowledge that his countrymen are not only long and broad, but also (though doubtless in a very slight degree) THICK or HIGH.
Well, that is my fate: and it is as natural for us Flatlanders to lock up a Square for preaching the Third Dimension, as it is for you Spacelanders to lock up a Cube for preaching the Fourth.
Patrons at the Flatlander Market cafe and bakery next door were evacuated.
Being a flatlander from central Minnesota, Dwight's Western hunting adventures were fascinating to this young teenager.
As a flatlander who now was carrying a heavy pack and hiking to over 11,000 feet, Chase attributed his lack of problems to Altitude Advantage.
It is something you should practice when you can create the opportunity--especially if you're a flatlander headed for the mountains.
Beginning about age 12, I spent my summers working for Flavel Horner, a sunburned flatlander who baled hay for a living.
Back home, while the boys were taking a well-deserved nap after our outing, stories of flatlander hunting accidents came to mind, along with a moral to the story.
AH: New Mexico is definitely "the land of enchantment," especially for a northwest Ohio flatlander like me, and Hummingbird is an oasis of beauty and delight in the Jemez Mountains.
I understand I'm a spoiled flatlander, but operations in high density altitude conditions to and from locations I normally would reject for an emergency landing seem to leave little margin for error, at least the kind of margin with which I'm accustomed.
I'll admit it, my birthright is as an Ohio-born flatlander. I didn't grow up around tidal waters, so until I moved west and had a chance to really study and learn what these coastal sea-faring folk have known for millennia, I was as unfamiliar with the daily ebb and flood as I am with what passes for country music these days.
Synopsis: "The Awkward Ozarker" is the witty, wise, and heart-warming memoir of Blant Hurt, a fifty-something flatlander with urban sensibilities, who buys a ratty weekend cabin up in the dark heart of the Ozark Mountains.