flats


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flat 1

 (flăt)
adj. flat·ter, flat·test
1.
a. Having a smooth, even surface: a flat field. See Synonyms at level.
b. Having a relatively broad level surface in relation to thickness or depth: a flat box.
2.
a. Being in horizontal position; lying down: flat on his back.
b. Being without slope or curvature: a flat line on a chart.
c. Having a low heel or no heel: flat shoes.
3. Free of qualification; absolute: a flat refusal.
4. Fixed; unvarying: a flat rate.
5. Lacking interest or excitement; dull: a flat scenario.
6.
a. Lacking in flavor: a flat stew that needs salt.
b. Having lost effervescence or sparkle: flat beer.
7.
a. Deflated. Used of a tire.
b. Electrically discharged. Used of a storage battery.
8. Of or relating to a horizontal line that displays no ups or downs and signifies the absence of physiological activity: A flat electroencephalogram indicates a loss of brain function.
9. Of or relating to a hierarchy with relatively few tiers or levels: a flat organization chart.
10. Commercially inactive; sluggish: flat sales for the month.
11. Unmodulated; monotonous: a flat voice.
12. Lacking variety in tint or shading; uniform: "The sky was bright but flat, the color of oyster shells" (Anne Tyler).
13. Not glossy; matte: flat paint.
14. Music
a. Being below the correct pitch.
b. Being one half step lower than the corresponding natural key: the key of B flat.
15. Designating the vowel a as pronounced in bad or cat.
16. Nautical Taut. Used of a sail.
17. Informal Having small breasts.
adv.
1.
a. Level with the ground; horizontally.
b. On or up against a flat surface; at full length.
2. So as to be flat.
3.
a. Directly; completely: went flat against the rules; flat broke.
b. Exactly; precisely: arrived in six minutes flat.
4. Music Below the intended pitch.
5. Business Without interest charge.
n.
1. A flat surface or part.
2. often flats A stretch of level ground: salt flats.
3. A shallow frame or box for seeds or seedlings.
4. A movable section of stage scenery, usually consisting of a wooden frame and a decorated panel of wood or cloth.
5. A flatcar.
6. A deflated tire.
7. A shoe with a flat heel.
8. A large flat piece of mail.
9. A horse that competes in a flat race. Also called runner.
10. Music
a. A sign (♭) used to indicate that a note is to be lowered by a semitone.
b. A note that is lowered a semitone.
11. Football The area of the field to either side of an offensive formation.
v. flat·ted, flat·ting, flats
v.tr.
1. To make flat; flatten.
2. Music To lower (a note) a semitone.
v.intr. Music
To sing or play below the proper pitch.

[Middle English, from Old Norse flatr; see plat- in Indo-European roots.]

flat′ly adv.
flat′ness n.

flat 2

 (flăt)
n.
1. An apartment on one floor of a building.
2. Archaic A story in a house.

[Alteration of Scots flet, inner part of a house, from Middle English, from Old English, floor, dwelling; see plat- in Indo-European roots.]

flats

(flæts) or

flatties

pl n
(Clothing & Fashion) shoes with flat heels or no heels
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flats - footwear (shoes or slippers) with no heel (or a very low heel)flats - footwear (shoes or slippers) with no heel (or a very low heel)
footgear, footwear - covering for a person's feet
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
References in classic literature ?
Plans were out for the erection of flats in Magnolia Road also.
The porter of the flats swears that no suspicious characters have been seen, and here he has pasted up a sort of dado on a public shop window, while the people in the shop--"
The little flats in such houses always have bells that ring like that.
But on the other side, on the flat Essex side, a shapeless and desolate red edifice, a vast pile of bricks with many windows and a slate roof more inaccessible than an Alpine slope, towers over the bend in monstrous ugliness, the tallest, heaviest building for miles around, a thing like an hotel, like a mansion of flats (all to let), exiled into these fields out of a street in West Kensington.
On my arrival at Starkfield, Denis Eady, the rich Irish grocer, who was the proprietor of Starkfield's nearest approach to a livery stable, had entered into an agreement to send me over daily to Corbury Flats, where I had to pick up my train for the Junction.
I had indulged in visions of better flats than these.
I don't mind floating down when there's two or three of us in the flat and we can sit up.
But the important point to notice, is that these cells are always made at that degree of nearness to each other, that they would have intersected or broken into each other, if the spheres had been completed; but this is never permitted, the bees building perfectly flat walls of wax between the spheres which thus tend to intersect.
Had the Queen of Sheba lived in the flat across the airshaft, Della would have let her hair hang out the window some day to dry just to depreciate Her Majesty's jewels and gifts.
He was quite short and stout and had a big head, which was flat at the top and supported by a thick neck full of wrinkles.
I went now and then to pleasant little luncheons at her flat, and to rather more formidable tea-parties.
At such a time I found out for certain, that this bleak place overgrown with nettles was the churchyard; and that Philip Pirrip, late of this parish, and also Georgiana wife of the above, were dead and buried; and that Alexander, Bartholomew, Abraham, Tobias, and Roger, infant children of the aforesaid, were also dead and buried; and that the dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard, intersected with dykes and mounds and gates, with scattered cattle feeding on it, was the marshes; and that the low leaden line beyond, was the river; and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing, was the sea; and that the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry, was Pip.