flatworm


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

flat·worm

 (flăt′wûrm′)
n.
Any of various parasitic and nonparasitic worms of the phylum Platyhelminthes, such as a tapeworm or a planarian, characteristically having a soft, flat, bilaterally symmetrical body and no body cavity. Also called platyhelminth.

flatworm

(ˈflætˌwɜːm)
n
(Animals) any parasitic or free-living invertebrate of the phylum Platyhelminthes, including planarians, flukes, and tapeworms, having a flattened body with no circulatory system and only one opening to the intestine

plat•y•hel•minth

(ˌplæt ɪˈhɛl mɪnθ)

n.
any of various unsegmented worms of the phylum Platyhelminthes, with a soft, flattened body, including the tapeworm, planarian, and trematode. Also called flatworm.
[1875–80; < New Latin Platyhelmintha flatworm. See platy-, helminth]
plat`y•hel•min′thic, adj.

flat·worm

(flăt′wûrm′)
Any of various worms having a flat, unsegmented body that is bilaterally symmetrical. Many flatworms, such as the tapeworm, are parasites. Also called platyhelminth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flatworm - parasitic or free-living worms having a flattened bodyflatworm - parasitic or free-living worms having a flattened body
flame cell - organ of excretion in flatworms
worm - any of numerous relatively small elongated soft-bodied animals especially of the phyla Annelida and Chaetognatha and Nematoda and Nemertea and Platyhelminthes; also many insect larvae
planaria, planarian - free-swimming mostly freshwater flatworms; popular in laboratory studies for the ability to regenerate lost parts
trematode, trematode worm, fluke - parasitic flatworms having external suckers for attaching to a host
cestode, tapeworm - ribbonlike flatworms that are parasitic in the intestines of humans and other vertebrates
Translations

flatworm

[ˈflætwɜːm] Nplatelminto m

flatworm

[ˈflætˌwɜːm] nverme m piatto, platelminta m

flat·worm

n. gusano plano que se aloja en los intestinos.

flatworm

n gusano plano
References in periodicals archive ?
Through an online investigation, she came to know that it is New Guinea flatworm. The Texas Invasive Species Institute (TISI) also confirmed it later.
Send them to Anthony Hendon, The Journal, 2nd Floor, Eldon Court, Percy Street, Newcastle NE1 7JB or email anthony.hendon1@reachplc.com answers WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN: Vaughan Williams; A flatworm; Dublin; 1981 REMEMBER WHEN: 1992 IMPOSSIPUZZLES: Jane is 27 years old (Linda 12).
For more than a century, scientists have witnessed the effects of this cellular marvel, which enables creatures such as the planarian flatworm to perform death-defying feats like re-growing a severed head.
PHOTO | BRIAN OKINDA | NMGKennedy Nyairumbi from Mulot wondered why his chicken had an egg-eating habit, fatal flatworm and roundworm infestation and produced greenish-diarrhoea.
In a paper that appeared online March 15 in the journal Science, the researchers describe a model for planarian (flatworm) eye regeneration that is governed by three principles acting in concert, which inform how progenitor cells behave in regeneration.
These garden snails fell victim to a parasitic flatworm. This happens when snails eat bird poop with flatworm eggs inside (see A Parasite's Life, right).
When a flatworm is cut in half, or when an organism is cloned via somatic cell nuclear transfer, a single organism gives rise to two distinct organisms.
The project entitled "The Flatworm Functional Genomics Initiative (Fugi)" will develop gamechanging research tools for the study and manipulation of parasitic flatworm species responsible for the devastating diseases echinococcosis (hydatid disease) and schistosomiasis (bilharzia), and is set to propel flatworm research into the 21st century.
cells can drown their individuality and abandon their free-living abilities in order to form a multicellular organism, which may be as simple as a flatworm, or as complicated as a giant sequoia, a whale, or a man.
Yet "they're about as closely related to the Asian species as you and I are to a flatworm," Bauer says.
As McConnell later wrote: "It was while we were running our first experiment, that Thompson and I wondered aloud, feeling rather foolish as we did so, what would happen if we conditioned a flatworm, then cut it in two and let both halves regenerate?
Schistosomiasis (also known as Bilharzia, snail fever, or Katayama fever) is caused by flatworm parasites that live in the blood vessels of the bladder and intestines.