fleet


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Related to fleet: Fleet Laxative

fleet 1

 (flēt)
n.
1. A number of warships operating together under one command.
2. A number of vessels having a shared origin, purpose, or area of operation: the Japanese merchant fleet; the North Pacific fishing fleet.
3. A group of vehicles, such as taxicabs or airliners, owned or operated as a unit.

[Middle English flete, from Old English flēot, from flēotan, to float; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

fleet 2

 (flēt)
adj. fleet·er, fleet·est
1. Moving swiftly and nimbly. See Synonyms at fast1.
2. Fleeting; evanescent.
v. fleet·ed, fleet·ing, fleets
v.intr.
1. To move or pass swiftly: The summer days fleeted by.
2. To fade; vanish: beauty that is fleeting away.
3. Obsolete To flow.
4. Obsolete To drift.
v.tr.
1. To cause (time) to pass quickly.
2. Nautical To alter the position of (tackle or rope, for example).

[Probably from Old Norse fljōtr. V., from Middle English fleten, to drift, float, from Old English flēotan; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

fleet′ly adv.
fleet′ness n.

fleet

(fliːt)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a number of warships organized as a tactical unit
2. (Nautical Terms) all the warships of a nation
3. (Aeronautics) a number of aircraft, ships, buses, etc, operating together or under the same ownership
[Old English flēot ship, flowing water, from flēotan to float]

fleet

(fliːt)
adj
1. rapid in movement; swift
2. poetic fleeting; transient
vb
3. (intr) to move rapidly
4. (intr) archaic to fade away smoothly; glide
5. (Nautical Terms) (tr) nautical
a. to change the position of (a hawser)
b. to pass (a messenger or lead) to a hawser from a winch for hauling in
c. to spread apart (the blocks of a tackle)
6. (intr) obsolete to float or swim
7. (tr) obsolete to cause (time) to pass rapidly
[probably Old English flēotan to float, glide rapidly; related to Old High German fliozzan to flow, Latin pluere to rain]
ˈfleetly adv
ˈfleetness n

fleet

(fliːt)
n
(Physical Geography) chiefly Southeast English a small coastal inlet; creek
[Old English flēot flowing water; see fleet1]

Fleet

(fliːt)
n
1. (Placename) a stream that formerly ran into the Thames between Ludgate Hill and Fleet Street and is now a covered sewer
2. (Placename) Also called: Fleet Prison (formerly) a London prison, esp used for holding debtors

fleet1

(flit)

n.
1. the largest organized unit of naval ships grouped for tactical or other purposes.
2. the largest organization of warships under the command of a single officer.
3. all the naval ships of a nation; navy.
4. a large group of ships, airplanes, trucks, etc., under the same management.
[before 1000; Middle English flete, Old English flēot]

fleet2

(flit)

adj. , fleet•er, fleet•est,
v. adj.
1. swift; rapid: to be fleet of foot; a fleet horse.
v.i.
2. to move swiftly; fly.
3. Naut. to change position; shift.
4. Archaic.
a. to flow.
b. to fade; vanish.
v.t.
5. to cause (time) to pass lightly or swiftly.
6. Naut. to move or change the position of.
[before 900; Middle English fleten to float, drift, flow, Old English flēotan, akin to float]
fleet′ly, adv.
fleet′ness, n.

fleet

An organization of ships, aircraft, Marine forces, and shore-based fleet activities all under the command of a commander or commander in chief who may exercise operational as well as administrative control. See also major fleet; numbered fleet.

Fleet

 the naval force of a country; a number of ships belonging to a company; a number of persons; birds or other objects moving in company; a group of lorries or trucks.
Examples: fleet of aircraft; of barges, 1840; of birds, 1884; of colliers, 1865; of wild ducks, 1810; of knights, 1450; of lant-horns, 1675; of lorries; of motor vehicles; of mudhens; of ships.

fleet


Past participle: fleeted
Gerund: fleeting

Imperative
fleet
fleet
Present
I fleet
you fleet
he/she/it fleets
we fleet
you fleet
they fleet
Preterite
I fleeted
you fleeted
he/she/it fleeted
we fleeted
you fleeted
they fleeted
Present Continuous
I am fleeting
you are fleeting
he/she/it is fleeting
we are fleeting
you are fleeting
they are fleeting
Present Perfect
I have fleeted
you have fleeted
he/she/it has fleeted
we have fleeted
you have fleeted
they have fleeted
Past Continuous
I was fleeting
you were fleeting
he/she/it was fleeting
we were fleeting
you were fleeting
they were fleeting
Past Perfect
I had fleeted
you had fleeted
he/she/it had fleeted
we had fleeted
you had fleeted
they had fleeted
Future
I will fleet
you will fleet
he/she/it will fleet
we will fleet
you will fleet
they will fleet
Future Perfect
I will have fleeted
you will have fleeted
he/she/it will have fleeted
we will have fleeted
you will have fleeted
they will have fleeted
Future Continuous
I will be fleeting
you will be fleeting
he/she/it will be fleeting
we will be fleeting
you will be fleeting
they will be fleeting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been fleeting
you have been fleeting
he/she/it has been fleeting
we have been fleeting
you have been fleeting
they have been fleeting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been fleeting
you will have been fleeting
he/she/it will have been fleeting
we will have been fleeting
you will have been fleeting
they will have been fleeting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been fleeting
you had been fleeting
he/she/it had been fleeting
we had been fleeting
you had been fleeting
they had been fleeting
Conditional
I would fleet
you would fleet
he/she/it would fleet
we would fleet
you would fleet
they would fleet
Past Conditional
I would have fleeted
you would have fleeted
he/she/it would have fleeted
we would have fleeted
you would have fleeted
they would have fleeted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fleet - group of aircraft operating together under the same ownershipfleet - group of aircraft operating together under the same ownership
aircraft - a vehicle that can fly
airline business, airline, airway - a commercial enterprise that provides scheduled flights for passengers
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
2.fleet - group of motor vehicles operating together under the same ownership
autobus, bus, charabanc, double-decker, jitney, motorbus, motorcoach, passenger vehicle, omnibus, coach - a vehicle carrying many passengers; used for public transport; "he always rode the bus to work"
bus line - an organization responsible for operating a bus transportation system
taxi, taxicab, cab, hack - a car driven by a person whose job is to take passengers where they want to go in exchange for money
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
motor pool - a fleet of military vehicles controlled by a single agency and available for use as needed
3.fleet - a group of steamships operating together under the same ownership
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
steamship company, steamship line - a line responsible for the operation of a fleet of steamships
argosy - one or more large merchant ships
4.fleet - a group of warships organized as a tactical unit
flotilla - a fleet of small craft
flotilla - a United States Navy fleet consisting of two or more squadrons of small warships
guided missile frigate - a frigate that carries guided missiles
combat ship, war vessel, warship - a government ship that is available for waging war
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
naval forces, navy - an organization of military vessels belonging to a country and available for sea warfare
armada - a large fleet
battle fleet - a fleet of warships prepared for battle
wolf pack - a group of submarines operating together in attacking enemy convoys
Verb1.fleet - move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart; "The hummingbird flitted among the branches"
butterfly - flutter like a butterfly
hurry, travel rapidly, zip, speed - move very fast; "The runner zipped past us at breakneck speed"
2.fleet - disappear gradually; "The pain eventually passed off"
disappear, vanish, go away - get lost, as without warning or explanation; "He disappeared without a trace"
Adj.1.fleet - moving very fast; "fleet of foot"; "the fleet scurrying of squirrels"; "a swift current"; "swift flight of an arrow"; "a swift runner"
fast - acting or moving or capable of acting or moving quickly; "fast film"; "on the fast track in school"; "set a fast pace"; "a fast car"

fleet

1
noun navy, vessels, task force, squadron, warships, flotilla, armada, naval force, sea power, argosy damage inflicted up on the British fleet

fleet

2
adjective swift, flying, fast, quick, winged, rapid, speedy, nimble, mercurial, meteoric, nimble-footed He was fleet as a deer.

fleet

adjective
1. Characterized by great celerity:
Informal: hell-for-leather.
Idiom: quick as a bunny.
verb
Translations
أُسْطُولأُسْطول، عَدَد كَبير منالأسْطول البَحْري
flotilaloďstvo
flåde
laivasto
flota
flottahajóhad
floti
艦隊
함대
classis
karo laivynaslaivynas
floteflotile
flota
flotta
กองเรือรบ
hạm đội

fleet

1 [fliːt] N
1. (Aer, Naut) → flota f
the British fleetla armada británica
Fleet Air Arm (Brit) → Fuerzas fpl Aéreas de la Armada
2. [of cars, coaches etc] → parque m (móvil)

fleet

2 [fliːt] (poet) ADJ (fleeter (compar) (fleetest (superl))) (also fleet-footed, fleet of foot) → veloz

fleet

[ˈfliːt] n
[ships] → flotte f
[lorries, cars] → parc m

fleet

1
n
(Naut) → Geschwader nt; (= entire naval force)Flotte f; Fleet Air ArmMarineluftwaffe f; merchant fleetHandelsflotte f
(of cars, coaches, buses etc)(Fuhr)park m; he owns a fleet of trucks/taxiser hat einen Lastwagenpark/ein Taxiunternehmen; fleet businessFirmenwagengeschäft nt

fleet

2
adj (+er)schnell, flink; fleet of foot, fleet-footedschnell- or leichtfüßig

fleet

1 [fliːt] nflotta; (of cars) → parco; (of lorries) → convoglio
they were followed by a fleet of cars → erano seguiti da un corteo di macchine

fleet

2 [fliːt] adj (poetic) (also fleet-footed) → svelto/a

fleet

(fliːt) noun
1. a number of ships or boats under one command or sailing together. a fleet of fishing boats.
2. the entire navy of a country. the British fleet

fleet

أُسْطُول flotila flåde Flotte στόλος flota laivasto flotte flota flotta 艦隊 함대 vloot flåte flota frota флот flotta กองเรือรบ filo hạm đội 舰队
References in classic literature ?
Let England have its navigation and fleet -- let Scotland have its navigation and fleet -- let Wales have its navigation and fleet -- let Ireland have its navigation and fleet -- let those four of the constituent parts of the British empire be be under four independent governments, and it is easy to perceive how soon they would each dwindle into comparative insignificance.
We travelled very fast and very far due south until the morning of the fifth day we sighted a great fleet of battleships sailing north.
Five hours later we sailed from the roofs of the dock buildings with a fleet of two hundred and fifty battleships, carrying nearly one hundred thousand green warriors, followed by a fleet of transports with our thoats.
The American North Atlantic squadron and pretty nearly the whole of our fleet.
I walked towards the north-east coast, over against Blefuscu, where, lying down behind a hillock, I took out my small perspective glass, and viewed the enemy's fleet at anchor, consisting of about fifty men of war, and a great number of transports: I then came back to my house, and gave orders (for which I had a warrant) for a great quantity of the strongest cable and bars of iron.
Your journalist, whether he takes charge of a ship or a fleet, almost invariably "casts" his anchor.
On board of this fleet was the English General Hill, with seven regiments of soldiers, who had been fighting under the Duke of Marlborough in Flanders.
They were cutting in between Hooja's fleet and our little dugout,
Some time after my arrival in Flanders news came of the league that his Holiness Pope Pius V of happy memory, had made with Venice and Spain against the common enemy, the Turk, who had just then with his fleet taken the famous island of Cyprus, which belonged to the Venetians, a loss deplorable and disastrous.
The Bank fleet pass good seamanship in silence; but a bungler is jeered all along the line.
There shall be seen upon a day, Between the Baugh and the May, The black fleet of Norway.
This was an account of the fight between a little ship called the Revenge and a Spanish fleet.