bacterium

(redirected from flesh-eating bacterium)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

bac·te·ri·um

 (băk-tîr′ē-əm)
n. pl. bac·te·ri·a (-tîr′ē-ə)
1. Any of various prokaryotic microorganisms of the domain Bacteria that may be free-living, saprophytic, commensal, or pathogenic and that vary widely in terms of morphology, oxygen tolerance, nutritional and temperature requirements, and motility. Also called eubacterium.
2. Any of the prokaryotic organisms, such as an archaeon. Not in scientific use.

[New Latin bactērium, from Greek baktērion, diminutive of baktron, rod; see bak- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bacterium

(bækˈtɪərɪəm)
n
(Microbiology) the singular of bacteria
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bac•te•ri•a

(bækˈtɪər i ə)

n.pl., sing. -te•ri•um (-ˈtɪər i əm)
any of numerous groups of microscopic one-celled organisms constituting the phylum Schizomycota, of the kingdom Monera, various species of which are involved in infectious diseases, nitrogen fixation, fermentation, or putrefaction.
[1905–10; < New Latin < Greek baktḗria, pl. of baktḗrion; see bacterium]
bac•te′ri•al, adj.
bac•te′ri•al•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bac·te·ri·um

(băk-tîr′ē-əm)
Plural bacteria
Any of a large group of one-celled organisms that lack a cell nucleus, reproduce by fission or by forming spores, and in some cases cause disease. They are found in all living things and in all of the Earth's environments, and usually live off other organisms. Bacteria make up most of the kingdom of prokaryotes.

bacterial adjective
Usage It is important to remember that bacteria is the plural of bacterium, and that saying a bacteria is incorrect. It is correct to say The soil sample contains millions of bacteria, and Tetanus is caused by a bacterium.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bacterium

(pl. bacteria) A very small, single-celled, prokaryotic organism.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bacterium - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fissionbacterium - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fission; important as pathogens and for biochemical properties; taxonomy is difficult; often considered to be plants
immune reaction, immune response, immunologic response - a bodily defense reaction that recognizes an invading substance (an antigen: such as a virus or fungus or bacteria or transplanted organ) and produces antibodies specific against that antigen
bioremediation - the act of treating waste or pollutants by the use of microorganisms (as bacteria) that can break down the undesirable substances
microorganism, micro-organism - any organism of microscopic size
acidophil, acidophile - an organism that thrives in a relatively acid environment
probiotic, probiotic bacterium, probiotic flora, probiotic microflora - a beneficial bacterium found in the intestinal tract of healthy mammals; often considered to be a plant
bacteroid - a rodlike bacterium (especially any of the rod-shaped or branched bacteria in the root nodules of nitrogen-fixing plants)
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
Calymmatobacterium, genus Calymmatobacterium - a genus of bacterial rods containing only the one species that causes granuloma inguinale
Francisella, genus Francisella - a genus of Gram-negative aerobic bacteria that occur as pathogens and parasite in many animals (including humans)
gonococcus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae - the pus-producing bacterium that causes gonorrhea
legionella, Legionella pneumophilia - the motile aerobic rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium that thrives in central heating and air conditioning systems and can cause Legionnaires' disease
nitrobacterium - any of the bacteria in the soil that take part in the nitrogen cycle; they oxidize ammonium compounds into nitrites or oxidize nitrites into nitrates
penicillin-resistant bacteria - bacteria that are unaffected by penicillin
pus-forming bacteria - bacteria that produce pus
rod - any rod-shaped bacterium
diplococcus - Gram-positive bacteria usually occurring in pairs
superbug - a strain of bacteria that is resistant to all antibiotics
resistance - the degree of unresponsiveness of a disease-causing microorganism to antibiotics or other drugs (as in penicillin-resistant bacteria)
microphage - a neutrophil that ingests small things (as bacteria)
microbiology - the branch of biology that studies microorganisms and their effects on humans
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
جرثومة
bakterie
bakterie
bakteeri
bakterija
baktérium
bakteríagerill
bakteria細菌
baktéria
bakterie

bacterium

[bækˈtɪərɪəm] N (bacteria (pl)) → bacteria f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

bacterium

n pl <bacteria> → Bakterie f, → Bakterium nt (old)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

bac·te·ri·um

n. bacteria, germen.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bacterium

n (pl -ria) (frec. pl) bacteria; resistant bacteria bacterias resistentes
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
An Indianapolis woman died last week after contracting a flesh-eating bacterium, known as necrotizing fasciitis, while on vacation in Florida.
The flesh-eating bacterium, in particular, causes an extremely vicious infection which progresses rapidly throughout the soft tissues of the body, often leaving doctors with little time to stop or delay the progress of the infection.
The then five-year old, a resident of Washington State, was a victim of a flesh-eating bacterium and doctors feared for his life.