fleshed


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flesh

 (flĕsh)
n.
1.
a. The soft tissue of the body of a vertebrate, covering the bones and consisting mainly of skeletal muscle and fat: thought the boy needed some more flesh on his bones.
b. Such tissue of an animal, used as food: flesh of a cow; fish with white flesh.
c. The surface or skin of the human body: goosebumps on my flesh.
d. Fatty tissue: "a woman of wide and abundant flesh" (A.S. Byatt).
2. Botany The pulpy, usually edible part of a fruit or vegetable.
3.
a. The human body: "the thousand natural shocks / That flesh is heir to" (Shakespeare).
b. Sensual appetites: gratification of the flesh.
4. Substance; reality: "The maritime strategy has an all but unstoppable institutional momentum behind it ... that has given force and flesh to the theory" (Jack Beatty).
v. fleshed, flesh·ing, flesh·es
v.tr.
1. To give substance or detail to; fill out. Often used with out: fleshed out the novel with a subplot.
2. To clean (a hide) of adhering flesh.
3. To encourage (a falcon, for example) to participate in the chase by feeding it flesh from a kill.
4. To plunge or thrust (a weapon) into flesh.
5. Archaic To inure (troops, for instance) to battle or bloodshed.
v.intr.
To become plump or fleshy; gain weight.
Idioms:
go the way of all flesh
1. To die.
2. To come to an end.
in the flesh
1. Alive.
2. In person; present.

[Middle English, from Old English flǣsc.]

flesh′less adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
But there he was in McKenzie's show, fleshed out with eerie naturalism in a group of colored-pencil portraits that depict him posing rakishly in plus fours and trench coat.
If the affect - raw and uncensored - belongs to Britain's young fashion iconoclasts, the chemistry lies elsewhere: in the melancholia of romance fleshed in failure.
Other growers are enthusiastic about white fleshed varieties that are considered to taste more delicate.