fletcher

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fletch·er

 (flĕch′ər)
n.
One who makes arrows.

[Middle English fleccher, from Old French flechier, from fleche, arrow, of Germanic origin; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fletcher

(ˈflɛtʃə)
n
(Professions) a person who makes arrows
[C14: from Old French flechier, from fleche arrow; see flèche]

Fletcher

(ˈflɛtʃə)
n
(Biography) John. 1579–1625, English Jacobean dramatist, noted for his romantic tragicomedies written in collaboration with Francis Beaumont, esp Philaster (1610) and The Maid's Tragedy (1611)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fletch•er

(ˈflɛtʃ ər)

n.
a person who makes arrows.
[1350–1400; Middle English fleccher < Old French flechier. See flè che, -er2]

Fletch•er

(ˈflɛtʃ ər)

n.
John, 1579–1625, English playwright.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fletcher - prolific English dramatist who collaborated with Francis Beaumont and many other dramatists (1579-1625)Fletcher - prolific English dramatist who collaborated with Francis Beaumont and many other dramatists (1579-1625)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
lukařšípař

fletcher

nPfeilmacher(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
These tendencies appear in the plays of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, whose reputations are indissolubly linked together in one of the most famous literary partnerships of all time.
Philip Massinger, a pupil and collaborator of Fletcher, was of thoughtful spirit, and apparently a sincere moralist at heart, in spite of much concession in his plays to the contrary demands of the time.
William Brewster Gilbert Winslow Isaac Allerton Edmund Margesson Miles Standish Peter Brown John Alden Richard Bitteridge John Turner George Soule Francis Eaton Edward Tilly James Chilton John Tilly John Craxton Francis Cooke John Billington Thomas Rogers Joses Fletcher Thomas Tinker John Goodman John Ridgate Mr.
Martin had let the contract for the new house and barn to Silas Fletcher, Fallon's leading carpenter, who had the science of construction reduced to utter simplicity.
There was a story they liked to tell of a man who had done well for himself at Bradford, and had five shops of his own, and had come back after fifteen years and visited Ma Fletcher and given her a gold watch.
I suppose I have not been a great reader of the drama, and I do not know that I have ever greatly relished any plays but those of Shakespeare and Goldoni, and two or three of Beaumont and Fletcher, and one or so of Marlow's, and all of Ibsen's and Maeterlinck's.
Horace Fletcher had nothing on me when it came to soda crackers.
Here is a friend of mine, Sam Fletcher, has got one to sell that would suit anybody.
Fletcher is going to be married, and she wants me to ask you to let her husband have the public- house and farm at Molton.
Our acts our angels are, or good or ill, Our fatal shadows that walk by us still." Epilogue to Beaumont and Fletcher's Honest Man's Fortune.
"And now thou must lie by quietly this day, and tonight, at ten o'clock, Phineas Fletcher will carry thee onward to the next stand,--thee and the rest of they company.
Fletcher, as you may have heard about, was the first woman to preach in the Society, I believe, before she was married, when she was Miss Bosanquet; and Mr.