flexion

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flex·ion

 (flĕk′shən)
n.
1. also flec·tion Anatomy
a. The act of bending a joint or limb in the body by the action of flexors.
b. The resulting condition of being bent.
2. A part that is bent.

[Latin flexiō, flexiōn-, a bending, from flexus, past participle of flectere, to bend.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flexion

(ˈflɛkʃən)
n
1. (Physiology) the act of bending a joint or limb
2. (Physiology) the condition of the joint or limb so bent
3. a variant spelling of flection
ˈflexional adj
ˈflexionless adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

flex•ion

(ˈflɛk ʃən)

n.
1.
a. the act of bending a limb.
b. the position that a limb assumes when it is bent.
2. a bent part.
[1595–1605; < Latin flexiō action of bending]
flex′ion•al, adj.
flex′ion•less, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

flexion

A bending or being bent, as of a joint.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flexion - the state of being flexed (as of a joint)flexion - the state of being flexed (as of a joint)
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
2.flexion - deviation from a straight or normal course
deviation, difference, divergence, departure - a variation that deviates from the standard or norm; "the deviation from the mean"
3.flexion - act of bending a joint; especially a joint between the bones of a limb so that the angle between them is decreased
bending - the act of bending something
flex - the act of flexing; "he gave his biceps a flex to impress the ladies"
dorsiflexion - the act of bending backward (of the body or a body part)
extension - act of stretching or straightening out a flexed limb
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

flexion

[ˈflekʃən] Nflexión f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

flex·ion

n. flexión, acto de flexionar o de ser flexionado.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

flexion

n flexión f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing on his research into Caucasian languages, Marr concluded that the Indo-European invaders had imposed (with varying degrees of success) ruling-class-languages on a Japhetic substratum, but that the language-building process (glossogeny), which produced the initial Japhetic equilibrium, was again proceeding through the same three stages as before: "The amorphous-synthetic [i.e., isolative] period was the period of the herd, the agglutinative--of the clan (rod), [and] the flexional of the individual (litso)" (Matthews 180).
(1-4) Deposits of GAGs in the wrist and hand lead to flexional contractures in the fingers, resulting in a claw-like appearance.
The findings of O'Flanagan et al .[1] showed that flexional deformity may influence the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and MRI measurement.
Zhang, "An elephant-trunk manipulator with twisting flexional rods," in Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, pp.
With the function of controlling the speed of standing up, the damper reduces the extensional torque or even generates a flexional torque if the extension of the knee becomes too fast.
The fluid circulating in the pipe has the flexional motion as that of structure.
Unlike Italian, German is a highly flexional language, and its rich compounding potential allows creating of unusually long compounds.