flexor

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Related to flexor retinaculum: extensor retinaculum

flex·or

 (flĕk′sər)
n.
A muscle that when contracted acts to bend a joint or limb in the body.

[New Latin, from Latin flexus, past participle of flectere, to bend.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flexor

(ˈflɛksə)
n
(Anatomy) any muscle whose contraction serves to bend a joint or limb. Compare extensor
[C17: New Latin; see flex]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

flex•or

(ˈflɛk sər)

n.
a muscle that serves to flex or bend a part of the body.
[1605–15; < New Latin; see flex1, -tor]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

flex·or

(flĕk′sər)
A muscle that bends or flexes a joint. Compare extensor.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flexor - a skeletal muscle whose contraction bends a jointflexor - a skeletal muscle whose contraction bends a joint
skeletal muscle, striated muscle - a muscle that is connected at either or both ends to a bone and so move parts of the skeleton; a muscle that is characterized by transverse stripes
extensor, extensor muscle - a skeletal muscle whose contraction extends or stretches a body part
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

flexor

[ˈfleksəʳ]
A. Nflexor m, músculo m flexor
B. ADJflexor
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

flexor (muscle)

nBeuger m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

flex·or

n. flexor, músculo que hace flexionar una articulación.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

flexor

adj & n flexor m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The diameters and CSA of the median nerve at the inlet of the tunnel (radioulnar joint level) (Figure 1), at the proximal tunnel (at the level of pisiform) (Figure 2), and at the outlet of the tunnel (at the level of hamate) (Figure 3), also volar bulging (VB: the farthest distance between the flexor retinaculum and an imaginary line tangent to the trapezium and hamate at the level of the distal carpal bones) were measured.
The long tendon crosses the flexor retinaculum and becomes incorporated into palmar aponeurosis (1,2).
In the distal part of the proximal third of the forearm, the accessory belly developed a tendon that runs parallel to the main belly tendon emitting small fascicles into it, but goes independently to deepen medially in the distal fifth of the forearm at the level of the carpal canal, where it fuses to the deep part of the flexor retinaculum (Fig.
It is covered here by the flexor retinaculum and divides into the medial and lateral plantar nerves in the foot.
The fibers of these tendons were attached to the pisiform, the hamate and proximal of the fifth metacarpal bone anterior to flexor retinaculum (Fig.
The median nerve extends just below the flexor retinaculum and between the muscles of the flexor pollicis longus and superficial digital flexor muscles.
On ultrasonographic examination, it appeared as a hyperechogenic interface, similar to the description of the flexor retinaculum by SHIELDS et al.
There is usually a compression of part of a nerve with consequent disturbance of microcirculation earlier in the course of CTS, but this is restored immediately after transection of the flexor retinaculum. With this restoration of microcirculation, there is often an immediate and delayed return of nerve function which further buttresses the fact that ischemia plays a role in the development of the constellation of symptoms and signs seen in entrapment neuropathies.
Though the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome had been known as back as in mid-1800s, the definite description of the condition could only be done after World War II.PI Learmonth in 1933 described two cases he operated in 1929, in which he divided flexor retinaculum for median neuropathy.
Once the transverse fibers of the flexor retinaculum are open medially under surgical loupes and headlight, the perineural microadhesions of the median nerve are resected and 3 mm of the free borders of the carpal fibers, found on the nerve, is removed and coagulated with bipolar gently to avoid fibrosis.
It is caused by pathology under or around the flexor retinaculum and has several etiologies, including tumors, tenosynovitis, and anomalous muscle bellies [7, 8].